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Lack of Education

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  • Orazem, Peter

Abstract

This paper reviews the stylized facts regarding the distribution of human capital investments and the returns to those investments in developing countries. It then examines recent evidence regarding which policies can induce increased human capital investments in the most efficient manner, using estimated benefits and costs as a guide.

Suggested Citation

  • Orazem, Peter, 2007. "Lack of Education," Staff General Research Papers Archive 12671, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:isu:genres:12671
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    File URL: http://www2.econ.iastate.edu/papers/paper_12671_06029.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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