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Health, Aging And Socio-Economic Conditions In Mexico

  • Franque Grimard

    ()

  • Sonia Laszlo

    ()

  • Wilfredo Lim

    ()

We investigate the long-term effect of childhood and adult socio-economic conditions on the health of the elderly in Mexico. We utilize a panel of individuals aged 50 and above from the Mexican Health and Aging Survey to examine whether the transition from good health in 2001 to good health in 2003 is affected by the conisions under which the individual lived at the age of 10, accounting for education and income. We find that socio-economic conditions affect the health of the elderly in Mexico. Individuals with higher levels of income and from higher childhood socio-economic backgrounds are more likely to remain in good health, conditional on their health in 2001. Our paper contributes to the literature of the long-term effects of socio-economic status by considering the case of the elderly in a developing country.

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File URL: http://www.mcgill.ca/files/economics/MexicoSES.pdf
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Paper provided by McGill University, Department of Economics in its series Departmental Working Papers with number 2008-06.

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Length: 24 pages
Date of creation: Jan 2008
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:mcl:mclwop:2008-06
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  7. Kenkel, D.S., 1988. "Health Behavior, Health Knowledge, And Schooling," Papers 10-88-3, Pennsylvania State - Department of Economics.
  8. John Strauss & Paul J. Gertler & Omar Rahman & Kristin Fox, 1993. "Gender and Life-Cycle Differentials in the Patterns and Determinants of Adult Health," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 28(4), pages 791-837.
  9. Strauss, John & Thomas, Duncan, 2008. "Health over the Life Course," Handbook of Development Economics, Elsevier.
  10. Roy, Kakoli & Chaudhuri, Anoshua, 2008. "Influence of socioeconomic status, wealth and financial empowerment on gender differences in health and healthcare utilization in later life: evidence from India," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 66(9), pages 1951-1962, May.
  11. Strauss, John & Thomas, Duncan, 1995. "Human resources: Empirical modeling of household and family decisions," Handbook of Development Economics, in: Hollis Chenery & T.N. Srinivasan (ed.), Handbook of Development Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 34, pages 1883-2023 Elsevier.
  12. Card, David, 1999. "The causal effect of education on earnings," Handbook of Labor Economics, in: O. Ashenfelter & D. Card (ed.), Handbook of Labor Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 30, pages 1801-1863 Elsevier.
  13. Akresh, Richard & Verwimp, Philip, 2006. "Civil War, Crop Failure, and the Health Status of Young Children," IZA Discussion Papers 2359, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
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  15. Grossman, Michael, 1972. "On the Concept of Health Capital and the Demand for Health," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 80(2), pages 223-55, March-Apr.
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