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The Transition from Good to Poor Health: An Econometric Study of the Older Population

Author

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  • Neil J. Buckley
  • Frank T. Denton
  • A. Leslie Robb
  • Byron G. Spencer

Abstract

This is a study of the influence of socioeconomic factors on the state of health of older Canadians. Three years of panel data from the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics are used to model the transition probabilities between good and poor health. Care is taken to avoid the problem of endogeneity of income in modelling its effects, and to adjust reported income to free it from its strong association with age at the time of the survey. Of particular note are the significant effects found for income, in spite of universal public health care coverage. Significant effects are found also for age, education, and other variables.

Suggested Citation

  • Neil J. Buckley & Frank T. Denton & A. Leslie Robb & Byron G. Spencer, 2003. "The Transition from Good to Poor Health: An Econometric Study of the Older Population," Quantitative Studies in Economics and Population Research Reports 381, McMaster University.
  • Handle: RePEc:mcm:qseprr:381
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Neil J. Buckley & Frank T. Denton & A. Leslie Robb & Byron G. Spencer, 2006. "Socio-economic Influences on the Health of Older Canadians: Estimates Based on Two Longitudinal Surveys," Canadian Public Policy, University of Toronto Press, vol. 32(1), pages 59-84, March.
    2. Hernández-Quevedo, Cristina & Jones, Andrew M. & Rice, Nigel, 2008. "Persistence in health limitations: A European comparative analysis," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(6), pages 1472-1488, December.
    3. Lixin Cai, 2008. "Be Wealthy to Stay Healthy: An Analysis of Older Australians Using the HILDA Survey," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2008n08, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
    4. Andrew M. Jones & Nigel Rice & Paul Contoyannis, 2012. "The Dynamics of Health," Chapters,in: The Elgar Companion to Health Economics, Second Edition, chapter 2 Edward Elgar Publishing.
      • Andrew M. Jones & Nigel Rice & Paul Contoyannis, 2006. "The Dynamics of Health," Chapters,in: The Elgar Companion to Health Economics, chapter 2 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    5. Nordin, Martin & Dackehag, Margareta & Gerdtham, Ulf-G., 2013. "Socioeconomic inequalities in drug utilization for Sweden: Evidence from linked survey and register data," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 77(C), pages 106-117.
    6. Cooper, D. & McCausland, W.D. & Theodossiou, I., 2006. "The health hazards of unemployment and poor education: The socioeconomic determinants of health duration in the European Union," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 4(3), pages 273-297, December.
    7. repec:eee:hepoli:v:121:y:2017:i:7:p:778-785 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Katharina Hauck & Aki Tsuchiya, 2010. "Health mobility: implications for efficiency and equity in priority setting," Monash Econometrics and Business Statistics Working Papers 6/10, Monash University, Department of Econometrics and Business Statistics.
    9. Bonnie-Jeanne MacDonald & Doug Andrews & Robert L. Brown, 2011. "The Canadian Elder Standard - Pricing the Cost of Basic Needs for the Canadian Elderly," Social and Economic Dimensions of an Aging Population Research Papers 286, McMaster University.
    10. Gerdtham, Ulf-G & Lundborg, Petter & Lyttkens, Carl Hampus & Nystedt, Paul, 2012. "Do Socioeconomic Factors Really Explain Income-Related Inequalities in Health? Applying a Twin Design to Standard Decomposition Analysis," Working Papers 2012:21, Lund University, Department of Economics.
    11. Athina Economou & Ioannis Theodossiou, 2011. "Poor And Sick: Estimating The Relationship Between Household Income And Health," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 57(3), pages 395-411, September.
    12. Frank T. Denton, 2004. "Exploring the Use of a Nonparametrically Generated Instrumental Variable in the Estimation of a Linear Parametric Equation," Quantitative Studies in Economics and Population Research Reports 390, McMaster University.
    13. Grimard, Franque & Laszlo, Sonia & Lim, Wilfredo, 2010. "Health, aging and childhood socio-economic conditions in Mexico," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 29(5), pages 630-640, September.
    14. Nilsson, William, 2006. "Socioeconomic Status and Sickness Absence - What do twins tell us about causality?," Umeå Economic Studies 670, Umeå University, Department of Economics.
    15. Neil J. Buckley & Frank T. Denton & A. Leslie Robb & Byron G. Spencer, 2003. "Socioeconomic Influence on the Health of Older People: Estimates Based on Two Longitudinal Surveys," Social and Economic Dimensions of an Aging Population Research Papers 112, McMaster University.
    16. Chen, Ping-Yu & Chang, Chia-Lin & Chen, Chi-Chung, 2010. "Estimating the Impacts of Climate Change on Mortality in OECD Countries," MPRA Paper 27915, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    17. Contoyannis, Paul & Li, Jinhu, 2011. "The evolution of health outcomes from childhood to adolescence," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(1), pages 11-32, January.
    18. Costa-Font, Joan & Hernández-Quevedo, Cristina, 2012. "Measuring inequalities in health: What do we know? What do we need to know?," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 106(2), pages 195-206.
    19. Neil J. Buckley & Frank T. Denton & A. Leslie Robb & Byron G. Spencer, 2004. "Healthy Aging at Older Ages: Are Income and Education Important?," Quantitative Studies in Economics and Population Research Reports 392, McMaster University.
    20. Kuo-Liang Chang & George Langelett & Andrew Waugh, 2011. "Health, Health Insurance, and Decision to Exit from Farming," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 32(2), pages 356-372, June.
    21. Franque Grimard & Sonia Laszlo & Wilfredo Lim, 2008. "Health, Aging And Socio-Economic Conditions In Mexico," Departmental Working Papers 2008-06, McGill University, Department of Economics.
    22. Chen, Ping-Yu & Chen, Chi-Chung & Chang, Chia-Lin, 2011. "Multiple Threshold Effects for Temperature and Mortality," MPRA Paper 35521, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    23. Cubi-Molla, P. & Jofre-Bonet, M. & Serra-Sastre, V., 2013. "Adaptation to Health States: A Micro-Econometric Approach," Working Papers 13/02, Department of Economics, City University London.
    24. William Nilsson, 2008. "Spousal Income and Sick Leave: What do Twins Tell us About Causality?," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 29(3), pages 407-426, September.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Socioeconomic factors and health; older population; panel data;

    JEL classification:

    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior

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