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The transition from good to poor health: an econometric study of the older population

  • Buckley, Neil J.
  • Denton, Frank T.
  • Leslie Robb, A.
  • Spencer, Byron G.

This is a study of the influence of socioeconomic factors on the state of health of older Canadians. Three years of panel data from the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics are used to model the transition probabilities between good and poor health. Care is taken to avoid the problem of endogeneity of income in modelling its effects, and to adjust reported income to free it from its strong association with age at the time of the survey. Of particular note are the significant effects found for income, in spite of universal public health care coverage. Significant effects are found also for age, education, and other variables.

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File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/B6V8K-4CNGRF0-1/2/3795cf58329b878d43b260d8539534e2
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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Health Economics.

Volume (Year): 23 (2004)
Issue (Month): 5 (September)
Pages: 1013-1034

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Handle: RePEc:eee:jhecon:v:23:y:2004:i:5:p:1013-1034
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/505560

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  1. Dana P. Goldman & James P. Smith, 2004. "Can Patient Self-Management Help Explain the SES Health Gradient?," HEW 0403004, EconWPA.
  2. Michael Baker & Mark Stabile & Catherine Deri, 2004. "What Do Self-Reported, Objective, Measures of Health Measure?," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 39(4).
  3. Angus Deaton, 2001. "Health, Inequality, and Economic Development," NBER Working Papers 8318, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. James P. Smith, 1999. "Healthy Bodies and Thick Wallets: The Dual Relation between Health and Economic Status," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 13(2), pages 145-166, Spring.
  5. Benzeval, Michaela & Judge, Ken, 2001. "Income and health: the time dimension," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 52(9), pages 1371-1390, May.
  6. Parminder Raina & Vicki Torrance-Rynard & Micheline Wong & Christel Woodward, 2002. "Agreement between Self-Reported and Routinely Collected Health Care Utilisation Data among Seniors," Social and Economic Dimensions of an Aging Population Research Papers 81, McMaster University.
  7. John Bound, 1991. "Self-Reported Versus Objective Measures of Health in Retirement Models," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 26(1), pages 106-138.
  8. Deanna L. Williamson & Janet E. Fast, 1998. "Poverty Status, Health Behaviours, and Health: Implications for Social Assistance and Health Care Policy," Canadian Public Policy, University of Toronto Press, vol. 24(1), pages 1-25, March.
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