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Agreement between Self-Reported and Routinely Collected Health Care Utilisation Data among Seniors

Author

Listed:
  • Parminder Raina
  • Vicki Torrance-Rynard
  • Micheline Wong
  • Christel Woodward

Abstract

Objective: To examine the agreement between self-reported and routinely collected administrative health care utilisation data, and the factors associated with agreement between these two data sources. Data Sources/Study Setting: A representative sample of seniors living in an Ontario county within Canada was identified using the Ontario Ministry of Health’s Registered Persons Data Base in 1992. Health professional billing information and hospitalisation data were obtained from the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care (OMH) and the Ontario Health Insurance Plan (OHIP). Principal Findings: Substantial to almost perfect agreement was found for the contact utilisation measures, while agreement on volume utilisation measures varied from poor to almost perfect. In surveys, seniors overreported contact with general practitioner and physiotherapists or chiropractors, and underreported contact with other medical specialists. Seniors also underreported the number of contacts with general practitioners and other medical specialists. The odds of agreement decreased if respondents were male, aged 75 years and older, had incomes of less than $25,000, had poor/fair/good self-assessed health status, or had two or more chronic conditions. Conclusion: The findings of this study indicate that there are substantial discrepancies between self-reported and administrative data among older adults. Researchers seeking to examine health care use among older adults need to consider these discrepancies in the interpretation of their results. Failure to recognize these discrepancies between survey and administrative data among older adults may lead to the establishment of inappropriate health care policies.

Suggested Citation

  • Parminder Raina & Vicki Torrance-Rynard & Micheline Wong & Christel Woodward, 2002. "Agreement between Self-Reported and Routinely Collected Health Care Utilisation Data among Seniors," Social and Economic Dimensions of an Aging Population Research Papers 81, McMaster University.
  • Handle: RePEc:mcm:sedapp:81
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    File URL: http://socserv.mcmaster.ca/sedap/p/sedap81.pdf
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    1. repec:aph:ajpbhl:1989:79:11:1554-1556_6 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. repec:aph:ajpbhl:1996:86:5:706-711_3 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. repec:aph:ajpbhl:1991:81:1:63-68_9 is not listed on IDEAS
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Neil J. Buckley & Frank T. Denton & A. Leslie Robb & Byron G. Spencer, 2006. "Socio-economic Influences on the Health of Older Canadians: Estimates Based on Two Longitudinal Surveys," Canadian Public Policy, University of Toronto Press, vol. 32(1), pages 59-84, March.
    2. Buckley, Neil J. & Denton, Frank T. & Leslie Robb, A. & Spencer, Byron G., 2004. "The transition from good to poor health: an econometric study of the older population," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 23(5), pages 1013-1034, September.
    3. Lebrun, Lydie A., 2012. "Effects of length of stay and language proficiency on health care experiences among Immigrants in Canada and the United States," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 74(7), pages 1062-1072.
    4. Lemieux, Ashley J. & Roy, Laurence & Martin, Michael S. & Latimer, Eric A. & Crocker, Anne G., 2017. "Justice involvement among homeless individuals with mental illnesses: Are self-report and administrative measures comparable?," Evaluation and Program Planning, Elsevier, vol. 61(C), pages 86-95.
    5. Hendrik Jürges & Vincent Pohl, 2012. "Medical guidelines, physician density, and quality of care: evidence from German SHARE data," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 13(5), pages 635-649, October.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    health services utilisation; seniors; self-reports; agreement; billing data;

    JEL classification:

    • I19 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Other

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