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Health, aging and childhood socio-economic conditions in Mexico


  • Grimard, Franque
  • Laszlo, Sonia
  • Lim, Wilfredo


We investigate the long-term effect of childhood socio-economic conditions on the health of the elderly in Mexico. We utilize a panel of individuals aged 50 and above from the Mexican Health and Aging Survey and find that the conditions under which the individual lived at the age of 10 affect health in old age, even accounting for education and income. This paper contributes to the literature of the long-term effects of childhood socio-economic status by being the first, to our knowledge, to consider exclusively the case of the elderly in a developing country.

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  • Grimard, Franque & Laszlo, Sonia & Lim, Wilfredo, 2010. "Health, aging and childhood socio-economic conditions in Mexico," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 29(5), pages 630-640, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jhecon:v:29:y:2010:i:5:p:630-640

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Weifan Zhang & Rebecca Liu & Chris Chatwin, 2016. "Chinese Medical Device Market and The Investment Vector," Papers 1609.05200,
    2. Venkataramani, Atheendar S., 2012. "Early life exposure to malaria and cognition in adulthood: Evidence from Mexico," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 31(5), pages 767-780.
    3. Grimard, F. & Laszlo, S., 2014. "Long-Term Effects of Civil Conflict on Women’s Health Outcomes in Peru," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 54(C), pages 139-155.

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