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The Impact of the Recent Expansion of the EU on the UK Labour Market

Author

Listed:
  • Blanchflower, David G.

    () (Dartmouth College)

  • Lawton, Helen

    (Bank of England)

Abstract

We examine the impact on the UK of the influx of workers from Eastern Europe. We look at the characteristics of the workers who have come to the UK since 2004. We also use data from a number of Eurobarometers 2004-2007 as well as the 2005 Work Orientation module International Social Survey Programme to look at the attitudes of residents of these countries. East Europeans report that they are unhappy with their lives and the country they live in, are dissatisfied with their jobs and would find difficulties in finding a new job or keeping their existing job. Relatively high proportions express a desire to move abroad. Expectations for the future for both their economy and their personal situations remain low but have improved since 2004. There has been some deterioration in the availability of jobs in the UK economy as the economy moves into recession. The UK is an attractive place to live and work for these workers. We argue that rather than dissipate, flows to the UK could remain strong well into the future.

Suggested Citation

  • Blanchflower, David G. & Lawton, Helen, 2008. "The Impact of the Recent Expansion of the EU on the UK Labour Market," IZA Discussion Papers 3695, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp3695
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Marco Manacorda & Alan Manning & Jonathan Wadsworth, 2006. "The Impact of Immigration on the Structure of Male Wages: Theory and Evidence from Britain," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 0608, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.
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    Cited by:

    1. Mussche, Ninke & Corluy, Vincent & Marx, Ive, 2016. "The Rise of the Free Movements: How Posting Shapes a Hybrid Single European Labour Market," IZA Discussion Papers 10365, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    2. Anna Rosso, 2016. "Skill Transferability and Immigrant-Native Wage Gaps," Development Working Papers 405, Centro Studi Luca d'Agliano, University of Milano, revised 21 Oct 2016.
    3. International Monetary Fund, 2016. "United Kingdom; Selected Issues," IMF Staff Country Reports 16/169, International Monetary Fund.
    4. repec:ces:ifodic:v:9:y:2012:i:4:p:17567560 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Brenke, Karl & Yuksel, Mutlu & Zimmermann, Klaus F, 2009. "EU Enlargement under Continued Mobility Restrictions: Consequences for the German Labor Market," CEPR Discussion Papers 7274, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    attitudes; EU expansion; migration;

    JEL classification:

    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers

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