IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/mpr/mprres/cfbc89b155c04d549a8e7595850e9c8e.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

The Return Motivations of Legal Permanent Migrants: Evidence from Exchange Rate Shocks and Immigrants in Australia

Author

Listed:
  • Paolo Abarcar

Abstract

This paper uses exogenous exchange rate shocks arising from the 1997 Asian Financial Crisis to distinguish between the motivations of Australian immigrants to return to their home country.

Suggested Citation

  • Paolo Abarcar, "undated". "The Return Motivations of Legal Permanent Migrants: Evidence from Exchange Rate Shocks and Immigrants in Australia," Mathematica Policy Research Reports cfbc89b155c04d549a8e75958, Mathematica Policy Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:mpr:mprres:cfbc89b155c04d549a8e7595850e9c8e
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0167268117302743
    Download Restriction: no

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Makin, Tony, 1999. "The Asian Currency Crisis and the Australian Economy," Economic Analysis and Policy, Elsevier, vol. 29(1), pages 77-85, March.
    2. Oded Stark & Christian Helmenstein & Yury Yegorov, 1997. "Migrants' Savings, Purchasing Power Parity, and the Optimal Duration of Migration," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, vol. 4(3), pages 307-324, July.
    3. Dustmann, Christian, 2003. "Return migration, wage differentials, and the optimal migration duration," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 47(2), pages 353-369, April.
    4. Kirdar, Murat, 2009. "Source Country Characteristics and Immigrants’ Migration Duration and Saving Decisions," MPRA Paper 13322, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Gibson, John & McKenzie, David, 2011. "The microeconomic determinants of emigration and return migration of the best and brightest: Evidence from the Pacific," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 95(1), pages 18-29, May.
    6. Mayer, Thierry & Zignago, Soledad, 2006. "Notes on CEPII’s distances measures," MPRA Paper 26469, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Arash Nekoei, 2013. "Immigrants' Labor Supply and Exchange Rate Volatility," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 5(4), pages 144-164, October.
    8. Alice Mesnard, 2004. "Temporary migration and capital market imperfections," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 56(2), pages 242-262, April.
    9. Guillermina Jasso & Mark Rosenzweig, 1982. "Estimating the emigration rates of legal immigrants using administrative and survey data: The 1971 cohort of immigrants to the United States," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 19(3), pages 279-290, August.
    10. Gunawardana, Pemasiri, 2005. "The Asian Currency Crisis and Australian Exports to East Asia," Economic Analysis and Policy, Elsevier, vol. 35(1-2), pages 73-90, March/Sep.
    11. Christian Dustmann & Yoram Weiss, 2007. "Return Migration: Theory and Empirical Evidence," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 0702, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.
    12. Christian Dustmann & Yoram Weiss, 2007. "Return Migration: Theory and Empirical Evidence from the UK," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 45(2), pages 236-256, June.
    13. Steven Radelet & Jeffrey Sachs, 1998. "The Onset of the East Asian Financial Crisis," NBER Working Papers 6680, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    14. Harris, John R & Todaro, Michael P, 1970. "Migration, Unemployment & Development: A Two-Sector Analysis," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 60(1), pages 126-142, March.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Parag Mahajan & Dean Yang, 2017. "Taken by Storm: Hurricanes, Migrant Networks, and U.S. Immigration," Working Papers 17-50, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.
    2. Nguyen, Ha & Duncan, Alan, 2015. "Macroeconomic fluctuations in home countries and immigrants’ well-being: New evidence from Down Under," MPRA Paper 69593, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised Feb 2016.
    3. Nguyen, Ha Trong & Duncan, Alan S, 2017. "Exchange rate fluctuations and immigrants' labour market outcomes: New evidence from Australian household panel data," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 105(C), pages 174-186.
    4. Akay, Alpaslan & Brausmann, Alexandra & Djajic, Slobodan & Kirdar, Murat G., 2018. "Purchasing-Power-Parity and the Saving Behavior of Temporary Migrants," Working Papers in Economics 735, University of Gothenburg, Department of Economics.
    5. Parag Mahajan & Dean Yang, 2017. "Taken by Storm: Hurricanes, Migrant Networks, and U.S. Immigration," NBER Working Papers 23756, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Akay, Alpaslan & Brausmann, Alexandra & Djajic, Slobodan & Kirdar, Murat G., 2018. "Purchasing-Power-Parity and the Saving Behavior of Temporary Migrants," IZA Discussion Papers 11679, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Return migration; Exchange rate; Immigrants; Australia;

    JEL classification:

    • F - International Economics
    • Z - Other Special Topics

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:mpr:mprres:cfbc89b155c04d549a8e7595850e9c8e. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Joanne Pfleiderer) or (Cindy George). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/mathius.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.