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Emigrant Selection and Wages: the Case of Poland

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  • Anna Rosso

    (University of Milan and Centro Studi Luca d'Agliano)

Abstract

In this paper, I use a unique individual-level pre-migration labour market dataset for Poland to examine emigrant selection in two major destination countries, the United Kingdom and Germany. I compare the pre-migration observable and unobservable characteristics of emigrants with those of non-emigrants in Poland. First, I find that Polish emigrants to the UK are more similarly educated to non-emigrants while being more negatively selected on residual wages. Second, emigrants to Germany are disproportionately more likely to fall in the middle of the education distribution but they are no different than non-emigrants in terms of unobservable skills. The familiar predictions of the Borjas (1987) model allow me to partially undercover the mechanism driving the selection patterns of Polish emigrants. I contribute to the migrant selection literature by providing additional evidence on how migrants respond to differences in both labour markets and migration policies across countries.

Suggested Citation

  • Anna Rosso, 2018. "Emigrant Selection and Wages: the Case of Poland," Development Working Papers 440, Centro Studi Luca d'Agliano, University of Milano, revised 08 Apr 2019.
  • Handle: RePEc:csl:devewp:440
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Renee Luthra & Lucinda Platt, 2021. "Are UK immigrants selected on education, skills, health and social networks?," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 2103, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    International migration; selection; skill prices; EU enlargement; inequality;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration
    • D33 - Microeconomics - - Distribution - - - Factor Income Distribution

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