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The Determinants and the Selection of Mexico–US Migrants

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  • J. William Ambrosini
  • Giovanni Peri

Abstract

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Suggested Citation

  • J. William Ambrosini & Giovanni Peri, 2012. "The Determinants and the Selection of Mexico–US Migrants," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 35(2), pages 111-151, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:worlde:v:35:y:2012:i:2:p:111-151
    DOI: j.1467-9701.2011.01425.x
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/j.1467-9701.2011.01425.x
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    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
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    Cited by:

    1. Bertoli, Simone & Dequiedt, Vianney & Zenou, Yves, 2016. "Can selective immigration policies reduce migrants' quality?," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 119(C), pages 100-109.
    2. Costanza Biavaschi & Michal Burzynski & Benjamin Elsner & Joël Machado, 2018. "Taking the Skill Bias out of Global Migration," Working Papers 201810, Geary Institute, University College Dublin.
    3. Ran Abramitzky & Leah Boustan, 2017. "Immigration in American Economic History," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 55(4), pages 1311-1345, December.
    4. Fernández-Huertas Moraga, Jesús, 2013. "Understanding different migrant selection patterns in rural and urban Mexico," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 103(C), pages 182-201.
    5. Umut Özek & David N. Figlio, 2016. "Cross-Generational Differences in Educational Outcomes in the Second Great Wave of Immigration," NBER Working Papers 22262, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Raymundo Campos-Vazquez & Jaime Lara, 2012. "Self-selection patterns among return migrants: Mexico 1990-2010," IZA Journal of Migration and Development, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 1(1), pages 1-18, December.
    7. Tani, Massimiliano, 2018. "Selective Immigration, Occupational Licensing, and Labour Market Outcomes of Foreign-Trained Migrants," IZA Discussion Papers 11370, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    8. Biavaschi, Costanza, 2016. "Recovering the counterfactual wage distribution with selective return migration," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 38(C), pages 59-80.
    9. Cristian Bartolucci & Mathis Wagner & Claudia Villosio, 2013. "Who Migrates and Why?," Carlo Alberto Notebooks 333, Collegio Carlo Alberto.
    10. Bougheas, Spiros & Nelson, Doug, 2013. "On the political economy of high skilled migration and international trade," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 63(C), pages 206-224.
    11. Andrés Villarreal, 2016. "The Education-Occupation Mismatch of International and Internal Migrants in Mexico, 2005–2012," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 53(3), pages 865-883, June.
    12. Bütikofer, Aline & Peri, Giovanni, 2017. "The Effects of Cognitive and Noncognitive Skills on Migration Decisions," Discussion Paper Series in Economics 17/2017, Norwegian School of Economics, Department of Economics.
    13. Michael S. Rendall & Susan W. Parker, 2014. "Two Decades of Negative Educational Selectivity of Mexican Migrants to the United States," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 40(3), pages 421-446, September.
    14. Burzy?ski, Micha? & Docquier, Frédéric & Rapoport, Hillel, 2018. "The Changing Structure of Immigration to the OECD: What Welfare Effects on Member Countries?," IZA Discussion Papers 11610, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    15. Alexander Patt & Jens Ruhose & Simon Wiederhold & Miguel Flores, 2017. "International Emigrant Selection on Occupational Skills," CESifo Working Paper Series 6527, CESifo Group Munich.
    16. repec:kap:poprpr:v:37:y:2018:i:2:d:10.1007_s11113-017-9456-y is not listed on IDEAS
    17. Tani, Massimiliano, 2017. "Skilled Migration Policy and the Labour Market Performance of Immigrants," IZA Discussion Papers 11241, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    18. repec:eee:jhecon:v:54:y:2017:i:c:p:1-16 is not listed on IDEAS
    19. Aguilar Esteva, Arturo Alberto, 2013. "Stayers and Returners: Educational Self-Selection among U.S. Immigrants and Returning Migrants," IZA Discussion Papers 7222, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    20. Biavaschi, Costanza, 2013. "Fifty Years of Compositional Changes in U.S. Out-Migration, 1908-1957," IZA Discussion Papers 7258, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

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