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The Effect of Emigration from Poland on Polish Wages

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  • Christian Dustmann
  • Tommaso Frattini
  • Anna Rosso

Abstract

In this paper, we analyse the effect of emigration from Poland on Polish wages. Focusing on the 1998–2007 period for Poland, we use a unique dataset that contains information about household members who are currently living abroad, which allows us to develop region-specific emigration rates and to estimate the effect of emigration on wages using within-region variation. Our findings show that emigration led to a slight increase in wages for high- and medium-skilled workers, which are the two groups with the largest relative outmigration rates. Workers at the low end of the skill distribution might have experienced wage decreases.

Suggested Citation

  • Christian Dustmann & Tommaso Frattini & Anna Rosso, 2015. "The Effect of Emigration from Poland on Polish Wages," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 117(2), pages 522-564, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:scandj:v:117:y:2015:i:2:p:522-564
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/sjoe.12102
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    2. Elsner, Benjamin, 2013. "Emigration and wages: The EU enlargement experiment," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 91(1), pages 154-163.
    3. Milo Bianchi & Paolo Buonanno & Paolo Pinotti, 2012. "Do Immigrants Cause Crime?," Journal of the European Economic Association, European Economic Association, vol. 10(6), pages 1318-1347, December.
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    6. Tommaso Frattini, 2012. "Immigrazione," Rivista di Politica Economica, SIPI Spa, issue 3, pages 363-407, July-Sept.
    7. Mckenzie, David & Rapoport, Hillel, 2007. "Network effects and the dynamics of migration and inequality: Theory and evidence from Mexico," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 84(1), pages 1-24, September.
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    9. Dustmann, Christian, 1997. "Return migration, uncertainty and precautionary savings," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 52(2), pages 295-316, April.
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    11. Pedersen, Peder J. & Pytlikova, Mariola & Smith, Nina, 2008. "Selection and network effects--Migration flows into OECD countries 1990-2000," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 52(7), pages 1160-1186, October.
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    13. George J. Borjas, 2003. "The Labor Demand Curve is Downward Sloping: Reexamining the Impact of Immigration on the Labor Market," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 118(4), pages 1335-1374.
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    Cited by:

    1. Elsner, Benjamin, 2013. "Emigration and wages: The EU enlargement experiment," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 91(1), pages 154-163.
    2. Lorenzo Caliendo & Luca David Opromolla & Fernando Parro & Alessandro Sforza, 2017. "Goods and Factor Market Integration: A Quantitative Assessment of the EU Enlargement," CESifo Working Paper Series 6600, CESifo Group Munich.
    3. Christian Dustmann & Uta Schönberg & Jan Stuhler, 2017. "Labor Supply Shocks, Native Wages, and the Adjustment of Local Employment," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 132(1), pages 435-483.
    4. Bratti, Massimiliano & De Benedictis, Luca & Santoni, Gianluca, 2018. "Immigrant Entrepreneurs, Diasporas and Exports," IZA Discussion Papers 11280, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    5. Anzelika Zaiceva, 2014. "Post-enlargement emigration and new EU members' labor markets," IZA World of Labor, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA), pages 1-40, August.
    6. Anna Rosso, 2016. "Skill Transferability and Immigrant-Native Wage Gaps," Development Working Papers 405, Centro Studi Luca d'Agliano, University of Milano, revised 21 Oct 2016.
    7. Christian Dustmann & Tommaso Frattini, 2014. "The Fiscal Effects of Immigration to the UK," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 124(580), pages 593-643, November.
    8. De Paoli, Anna & Mendola, Mariapia, 2014. "International Labor Mobility and Child Work in Developing Countries," IZA Discussion Papers 8066, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    9. Giesing, Yvonne & Laurentsyeva, Nadzeya, 2016. "Emigration and Firm Productivity: Evidence from the Sequential Opening of EU Labour Markets," Annual Conference 2016 (Augsburg): Demographic Change 145850, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    10. Anna De Paoli & Mariapia Mendola, 2014. "International Labor Mobility and Child Work in Developing Countries," Development Working Papers 365, Centro Studi Luca d'Agliano, University of Milano, revised 07 Apr 2014.
    11. Prachi Mishra, 2014. "Emigration and wages in source countries: a survey of the empirical literature," Chapters,in: International Handbook on Migration and Economic Development, chapter 9, pages 241-266 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    12. Falco, Chiara & Rotondi, Valentina, 2016. "The Less Extreme, the More You Leave: Radical Islam and Willingness to Migrate," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 88(C), pages 122-133.
    13. World Bank, "undated". "Europe and Central Asia Economic Update, October 2017," World Bank Other Operational Studies 28534, The World Bank.
    14. repec:bla:worlde:v:40:y:2017:i:4:p:678-702 is not listed on IDEAS
    15. Amalia Cristescu & Maria Denisa Vasilescu & Larisa Stanila & Madalina Ecaterina Popescu, 2013. "Regional Analysis Of The Real Earnings In Romania," Romanian Journal of Regional Science, Romanian Regional Science Association, vol. 7(2), pages 58-78, DECEMBER.
    16. Michael A. Clemens & Claudio Montenegro & Lant Pritchett, 2016. "Bounding the Price Equivalent of Migration Barriers," CID Working Papers 316, Center for International Development at Harvard University.
    17. Benjamin Elsner, 2015. "Does emigration increase the wages of non-emigrants in sending countries?," IZA World of Labor, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA), pages 208-208, November.
    18. Chiara FALCO & Valentina ROTONDI, 2016. "The Less Extreme, the More You Leave: Radical Islam and Willingness to Migrate," Departmental Working Papers 2016-04, Department of Economics, Management and Quantitative Methods at Università degli Studi di Milano.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials
    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers

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