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Access to Infrastructure and Women’s Time Allocation: Evidence and a Framework for Policy Analysis

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  • Pierre-Richard AGENOR

    (University of Manchester)

  • Otaviano CANUTO

    (FERDI)

Abstract

This paper studies the interactions between access to infrastructure, women’s time allocation, and economic growth in developing countries. The first part provides a review of the evidence on the impact of poor infrastructure on women’s ability to allocate their time to productive activities. The second part presents a quantitative framework for policy analysis, in the form of a gender-based, computable overlapping generations (OLG) model of economic growth that captures these interactions as well as of inter- and intra-generational health externalities. The model is then calibrated for a low-income country (Benin) and used to quantify the impact of a policy aimed at improving access to infrastructure on women’s time allocation, growth and education and health outcomes. Implications of the analysis for strengthening the role of women in the growth process in developing economies are also discussed.Revised version November 2013

Suggested Citation

  • Pierre-Richard AGENOR & Otaviano CANUTO, 2012. "Access to Infrastructure and Women’s Time Allocation: Evidence and a Framework for Policy Analysis," Working Papers P45, FERDI.
  • Handle: RePEc:fdi:wpaper:477
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    Cited by:

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    3. Chiara Piovani & Nursel Aydiner-Avsar, 2015. "The Gender Impact of Social Protection Policies: A Critical Review of the Evidence," Review of Political Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 27(3), pages 410-441, July.
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    5. Leanne Roncolato & Nicholas Reksten & Caren Grown, 2017. "Engendering Growth Diagnostics: Examining Constraints to Private Investment and Entrepreneurship," Development Policy Review, Overseas Development Institute, vol. 35(2), pages 263-287, January.

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply
    • O18 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Urban, Rural, Regional, and Transportation Analysis; Housing; Infrastructure

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