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A Computable OLG Model for Gender and Growth Policy Analysis

  • Pierre-Richard Agénor

This paper develops a computable Overlapping Generations (OLG) model for gender and growth policy analysis. The model accounts for human and physical capital accumulation (both public and private), intra- and inter-generational health persistence, fertility choices, and women's time allocation between market work, child rearing, and home production. Bargaining between spouses and gender bias, in the form of discrimination in the work place and mothers' time allocation between daughters and sons, are also accounted for. The model is calibrated for a low-income country and various experiments are conducted, including improved access to infrastructure, an increase in subsidies to child care, and a reduction in gender bias. By focusing on steady-state effects, based on an explicit analytical characterization of the long-run equilibrium, the model provides a practical tool that may help to integrate more systematically interactions between structural policies, gender, and growth.

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Paper provided by Economics, The Univeristy of Manchester in its series Centre for Growth and Business Cycle Research Discussion Paper Series with number 169.

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Length: 63 pages
Date of creation: 2012
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:man:cgbcrp:169
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  1. Xu, Zeyu, 2007. "A survey on intra-household models and evidence," MPRA Paper 3763, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  2. C. Mark Blackden & Quentin Wodon, 2006. "Gender, Time Use, and Poverty in Sub-Saharan Africa," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 7214.
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  4. Nezih Guner, 2011. "Taxing Women: A Macroeconomic Analysis," 2011 Meeting Papers 581, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  5. David de la Croix & Omar Licandro, 2007. "‘The Child is Father of the Man:’ Implications for the Demographic Transition," Economics Working Papers ECO2007/05, European University Institute.
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  8. David DE LA CROIX & Matthias DOEPKE, 2002. "Public versus Private Education When Diferential Fertility Matters," Discussion Papers (IRES - Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales) 2002013, Université catholique de Louvain, Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales (IRES).
  9. David, DE LA CROIX & Marie, VANDER DONCKT, 2008. "Would empowering women initiate the demographic transition in least-developing countries ?," Discussion Papers (ECON - Département des Sciences Economiques) 2008026, Université catholique de Louvain, Département des Sciences Economiques.
  10. Taryn Dinkelman, 2011. "The Effects of Rural Electrification on Employment: New Evidence from South Africa," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 101(7), pages 3078-3108, December.
  11. Osang, Thomas & Sarkar, Jayanta, 2005. "Endogenous Mortality, Human Capital and Endogenous Growth," Departmental Working Papers 0511, Southern Methodist University, Department of Economics.
  12. Agénor, Pierre-Richard & Canuto, Otaviano & da Silva, Luiz Pereira, 2014. "On gender and growth: The role of intergenerational health externalities and women's occupational constraints," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 30(C), pages 132-147.
  13. Qingyuan Du & Shang-Jin Wei, 2010. "A Sexually Unbalanced Model of Current Account Imbalances," NBER Working Papers 16000, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  14. Angel-Urdinola, Diego & Wodon, Quentin, 2010. "Income Generation and Intra-Household Decision Making: A Gender Analysis for Nigeria," MPRA Paper 27738, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  15. Pedro R.D. Bom & Jenny E. Ligthart, 2014. "What Have We Learned From Three Decades Of Research On The Productivity Of Public Capital?," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 28(5), pages 889-916, December.
  16. Blackden, Mark & Canagarajah, Sudharshan & Klasen, Stephan & Lawson, David, 2006. "Gender and Growth in Sub-Saharan Africa: Issues and Evidence," Working Paper Series RP2006/37, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
  17. Karine S. Moe, 1998. "Fertility, Time Use, and Economic Development," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 1(3), pages 699-718, July.
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  20. repec:cor:louvrp:-2160 is not listed on IDEAS
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