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Child Labor, Intra-Household Bargaining and Economic Growth

  • Pierre-Richard Agénor
  • Baris Alpaslan

This paper develops a three-period, gender-based overlapping generations model of endogenous growth with endogenous intra-household bargaining and child labor in home production by girls. Improved access to infrastructure reduces the amount of time parents find optimal for their daughters to spend on household chores, thereby allowing them to allocate more time to studying at home. The model is calibrated for a low-income country and various quantitative experiments are conducted, including an increase in the share of public spending on infrastructure, an increase in time allocated by mothers to their daughters, and a decrease in fathers' preference for girls' education. Our analysis shows that poor access by families to infrastructure may provide an endogenous explanation, beyond social norms and cultural values, for the persistence in child labor at home and gender inequality in low-income countries.

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File URL: http://hummedia.manchester.ac.uk/schools/soss/cgbcr/discussionpapers/dpcgbcr181.pdf
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Paper provided by Economics, The Univeristy of Manchester in its series Centre for Growth and Business Cycle Research Discussion Paper Series with number 181.

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Length: 44 pages
Date of creation: 2013
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:man:cgbcrp:181
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  1. Reggio, Iliana, 2011. "The influence of the mother's power on her child's labor in Mexico," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 96(1), pages 95-105, September.
  2. Bell, Clive & Gersbach, Hans, 2009. "Child Labor And The Education Of A Society," Macroeconomic Dynamics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 13(02), pages 220-249, April.
  3. Greenwood,J. & Seshadri,A. & Yorukoglu,M., 2002. "Engines of liberation," Working papers 1, Wisconsin Madison - Social Systems.
  4. Matthias Doepke & Michèle Tertilt, 2014. "Does Female Empowerment Promote Economic Development," CESifo Working Paper Series 4661, CESifo Group Munich.
  5. Sanjeev Gupta & Alvar Kangur & Abdoul Wane & Chris Papageorgiou, 2011. "Efficiency-Adjusted Public Capital and Growth," IMF Working Papers 11/217, International Monetary Fund.
  6. Thomas Masterson, 2008. "An Empirical Analysis of Gender Bias in Education Spending in Paraguay," Economics Working Paper Archive wp_550, Levy Economics Institute.
  7. Dante Contreras & Daniela Kruger & Daniela Zapata, 2007. "Child Labor And Schooling In Bolivia: Who’s Falling Behind? The Roles Of Domestic Work, Gender And Ethnicity," Working Papers wp234, University of Chile, Department of Economics.
  8. Masako Kimura & Daishin Yasui, 2010. "The Galor–Weil gender-gap model revisited: from home to market," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 15(4), pages 323-351, December.
  9. Johannes P. Jütting & Angela Luci & Christian Morrisson, 2010. "Why Do so many Women End up in Bad Jobs?: A Cross-country Assessment," OECD Development Centre Working Papers 287, OECD Publishing.
  10. Blackden, Mark & Canagarajah, Sudharshan & Klasen, Stephan & Lawson, David, 2006. "Gender and Growth in Sub-Saharan Africa: Issues and Evidence," Working Paper Series RP2006/37, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
  11. de la CROIX, David & VANDER DONCKT, Marie, 2008. "Would empowering women initiate the demographic transition in least-developed countries?," CORE Discussion Papers 2008043, Université catholique de Louvain, Center for Operations Research and Econometrics (CORE).
  12. Galor, Oded & Weil, David, 1995. "The Gender Gap, Fertility and Growth," CEPR Discussion Papers 1157, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  13. Agénor, Pierre-Richard & Canuto, Otaviano & da Silva, Luiz Pereira, 2014. "On gender and growth: The role of intergenerational health externalities and women's occupational constraints," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 30(C), pages 132-147.
  14. Baldacci, Emanuele & Hillman, Arye L. & Kojo, Naoko C., 2004. "Growth, governance, and fiscal policy transmission channels in low-income countries," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 20(3), pages 517-549, September.
  15. Angel-Urdinola, Diego & Wodon, Quentin, 2010. "Income Generation and Intra-Household Decision Making: A Gender Analysis for Nigeria," MPRA Paper 27738, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  16. Pedro R.D. Bom & Jenny E. Ligthart, 2014. "What Have We Learned From Three Decades Of Research On The Productivity Of Public Capital?," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 28(5), pages 889-916, December.
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