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Changing Technologies of Household Production: Causes and Effects

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  • Joyce P. Jacobsen

    () (Department of Economics, Wesleyan University)

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  • Joyce P. Jacobsen, 2013. "Changing Technologies of Household Production: Causes and Effects," Wesleyan Economics Working Papers 2013-004, Wesleyan University, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:wes:weswpa:2013-004
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    File URL: http://repec.wesleyan.edu/pdf/jjacobsen/2013004_jacobsen.pdf
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    1. Jeremy Greenwood & Nezih Guner & Georgi Kocharkov & Cezar Santos, 2016. "Technology and the Changing Family: A Unified Model of Marriage, Divorce, Educational Attainment, and Married Female Labor-Force Participation," American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 8(1), pages 1-41, January.
    2. Taryn Dinkelman, 2011. "The Effects of Rural Electrification on Employment: New Evidence from South Africa," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 101(7), pages 3078-3108, December.
    3. Joana Costa & Degol Hailu & Elydia Silva & Raquel Tsukada, 2009. "The Implications of Water and Electricity Supply for the Time Allocation of Women in Rural Ghana," Working Papers 59, International Policy Centre for Inclusive Growth.
    4. Betsey Stevenson & Justin Wolfers, 2009. "The Paradox of Declining Female Happiness," American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, American Economic Association, vol. 1(2), pages 190-225, August.
    5. Betsey Stevenson & Justin Wolfers, 2007. "Marriage and Divorce: Changes and their Driving Forces," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 21(2), pages 27-52, Spring.
    6. Tiago V. de V. Cavalcanti & José Tavares, 2008. "Assessing the "Engines of Liberation": Home Appliances and Female Labor Force Participation," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 90(1), pages 81-88, February.
    7. Ramey, Valerie A., 2009. "Time Spent in Home Production in the Twentieth-Century United States: New Estimates from Old Data," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 69(01), pages 1-47, March.
    8. Nidhiya Menon, 2009. "Rainfall Uncertainty and Occupational Choice in Agricultural Households of Rural Nepal," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 45(6), pages 864-888.
    9. Rachel Connelly & Jean Kimmel, 2010. "The Time Use of Mothers in the United States at the Beginning of the 21st Century," Books from Upjohn Press, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research, number tuom, November.
    10. Chinhui Juhn & Sandra E. Black, 2000. "The Rise of Female Professionals: Are Women Responding to Skill Demand?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(2), pages 450-455, May.
    11. Coen-Pirani, Daniele & León, Alexis & Lugauer, Steven, 2010. "The effect of household appliances on female labor force participation: Evidence from microdata," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 17(3), pages 503-513, June.
    12. Thomas J. Weiss, 1986. "Revised Estimates of the United States Workforce, 1800-1860," NBER Chapters,in: Long-Term Factors in American Economic Growth, pages 641-676 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    13. Nadeem Ilahi & Franque Grimard, 2000. "Public Infrastructure and Private Costs: Water Supply and Time Allocation of Women in Rural Pakistan," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 49(1), pages 45-76.
    14. Michael Lokshin & Ruslan Yemtsov, 2005. "Has Rural Infrastructure Rehabilitation in Georgia Helped the Poor?," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 19(2), pages 311-333.
    15. Emanuela Cardia, 2008. "Household Technology: Was it the Engine of Liberation?}," 2008 Meeting Papers 826, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    16. Taryn Dinkelman, 2010. "The Effects of Rural Electrification on Employment: New Evidence from South Africa," Working Papers 1255, Princeton University, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Research Program in Development Studies..
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