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Measuring the Effect of Gender-Based Policies on Economic Growth


  • Pierre-Richard Agénor
  • Otaviano Canuto


To this day, policy makers, policy advisers, and economists in development institutions do not have any practical tools to help them to assess the impacts of policies aimed at promoting gender equality and quantify the effect of these policies on growth. Yet, there has been limited effort in that direction. This note lays out such a tool,1 a framework for quantifying the growth effects of gender-based policies in developing economies, developed recently in the context of a research project sponsored by the World Bank. The framework is based on analysis using a computable overlapping generations model that accounts for the impact of access to infrastructure on women’s time allocation, as well as human capital accumulation and inter- and intragenerational health externalities. The analysis also presents illustrative gender-based experiments in a calibrated version for a low-income country (Benin).
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Suggested Citation

  • Pierre-Richard Agénor & Otaviano Canuto, 2012. "Measuring the Effect of Gender-Based Policies on Economic Growth," World Bank Other Operational Studies 10037, The World Bank.
  • Handle: RePEc:wbk:wboper:10037

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Era Dabla-Norris & Jim Brumby & Annette Kyobe & Zac Mills & Chris Papageorgiou, 2012. "Investing in public investment: an index of public investment efficiency," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 17(3), pages 235-266, September.
    2. Pierre-Richard Agénor, 2015. "Public capital, health persistence and poverty traps," Journal of Economics, Springer, vol. 115(2), pages 103-131, June.
    3. Pierre-Richard AGENOR & Otaviano CANUTO, 2012. "Access to Infrastructure and Women’s Time Allocation: Evidence and a Framework for Policy Analysis," Working Papers P45, FERDI.
    4. Blackden, Mark & Canagarajah, Sudharshan & Klasen, Stephan & Lawson, David, 2006. "Gender and Growth in Sub-Saharan Africa: Issues and Evidence," WIDER Working Paper Series 037, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
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    Cited by:

    1. Barbara Kotschwar & Tyler Moran, 2015. "Pitching a Level Playing Field: Women and Leadership in Sports," Policy Briefs PB15-22, Peterson Institute for International Economics.
    2. Barbara Kotschwar, 2014. "Women, Sports, and Development: Does It Pay to Let Girls Play?," Policy Briefs PB14-8, Peterson Institute for International Economics.


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