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The impact of roads and agricultural extension on consumption growth and poverty in fifteen Ethiopian villages

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  • Stefan Dercon
  • Daniel O. Gilligan
  • John Hoddinott
  • Tassew Woldehanna

Abstract

This paper investigates whether public investments that led to improvements in road quality and increased access to agricultural extension services led to faster consumption growth and lower rates of poverty in rural Ethiopia. Using a Generalized Methods of Moments . Instrumental Variables. Household Fixed Effects estimator, we find evidence of positive impacts with meaningful magnitudes. Access to all-weather roads increases consumption growth by 16 per cent and, reduces the incidence of poverty by 6.7 per cent. Receiving at least one visit from an extension agent raises consumption growth by 7 per cent and reduces poverty incidence by nearly 10 per cent. These results are robust to changes in model specification and estimation methods.

Suggested Citation

  • Stefan Dercon & Daniel O. Gilligan & John Hoddinott & Tassew Woldehanna, 2007. "The impact of roads and agricultural extension on consumption growth and poverty in fifteen Ethiopian villages," CSAE Working Paper Series 2007-01, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.
  • Handle: RePEc:csa:wpaper:2007-01
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    File URL: https://ora.ox.ac.uk/objects/uuid:e524e444-5d47-466a-94ae-d97af5e64254
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. de Janvry, Alain & Finan, Frederico & Sadoulet, Elisabeth & Vakis, Renos, 2006. "Can conditional cash transfer programs serve as safety nets in keeping children at school and from working when exposed to shocks?," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 79(2), pages 349-373, April.
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    Cited by:

    1. Antonio Estache, 2010. "A survey of impact evaluations of infrastructure projects, programs and policies," Working Papers ECARES 2010_005, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
    2. Stefan Dercon & John Hoddinott & Tassew Woldehanna, 2012. "Growth and Chronic Poverty: Evidence from Rural Communities in Ethiopia," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 48(2), pages 238-253, February.

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