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Long-term impact of investments in early schooling — Empirical evidence from rural Ethiopia

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  • Mani, Subha
  • Hoddinott, John
  • Strauss, John

Abstract

We examine the cumulative impact of early schooling investments on later schooling outcomes using enrollment status and relative grade attainment as short-run and long-run measures of schooling. Using a child-level longitudinal data set from rural Ethiopia, we estimate a dynamic conditional schooling demand function where the coefficient estimate on the lagged dependent variable captures the impact of all previous period schooling inputs and resources. We find that a child who is enrolled in the prior period is 33 percentage points more likely to be enrolled currently. These lagged effects are stronger for girls and for children from higher income households.

Suggested Citation

  • Mani, Subha & Hoddinott, John & Strauss, John, 2012. "Long-term impact of investments in early schooling — Empirical evidence from rural Ethiopia," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 99(2), pages 292-299.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:deveco:v:99:y:2012:i:2:p:292-299
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jdeveco.2012.03.002
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Demeke, Abera Birhanu & Zeller, Manfred, 2012. "Weather Risk and Household Participation in Off-farm Activities in Rural Ethiopia," Quarterly Journal of International Agriculture, Humboldt-Universitaat zu Berlin, vol. 51(1), pages 1-20, February.
    2. Christophe Muller, 2014. "A Test of Separability of Consumption and Production Decisions of Farm Households in Ethiopia," Post-Print hal-01463117, HAL.
    3. Zhang, Hongliang & Behrman, Jere R. & Fan, C. Simon & Wei, Xiangdong & Zhang, Junsen, 2014. "Does parental absence reduce cognitive achievements? Evidence from rural China," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 111(C), pages 181-195.
    4. Justine Herve & Subha Mani & Jere Behrman & Arindam Nandi & Anjana Sankhil Lamkang & Ramanan Laxminarayan, 2021. "Gender Gaps in Cognitive and Noncognitive Skills: Roles of SES and Gender Attitudes," PIER Working Paper Archive 21-007, Penn Institute for Economic Research, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Schooling; Path dependence; Panel data; Dynamic model;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • C23 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models

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