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Here Today, Gone Tomorrow? Examining the Extent and Implications of Low Persistence in Child Learning

Author

Listed:
  • Andrabi, Tahir

    (Pomona College)

  • Das, Jishnu

    (World Bank and Center for Policy Research, New Delhi)

  • Khwaja, Asim Ijaz

    (Harvard University and BREAD)

  • Zajonc, Tristan

    (Harvard University)

Abstract

Learning persistence plays a central role in models of skill formation, estimates of education production functions, and evaluations of educational programs. In non-experimental settings, estimated impacts of educational inputs can be highly sensitive to correctly specifying persistence when inputs are correlated with baseline achievement. While less of a concern in experimental settings, persistence still links short-run treatment effects to long-run impacts. We study learning persistence using dynamic panel methods that account for two key empirical challenges: unobserved student-level heterogeneity in learning and measurement error in test scores. Our estimates, based on detailed primary panel data from Pakistan, suggest that only a fifth to a half of achievement persists between grades. Using private schools as an example, we show that incorrectly assuming high persistence significantly understates and occasionally yields the wrong sign for private schools' impact on achievement. Towards an economic interpretation of low persistence, we use question-level exam responses as well as household expenditure and time-use data to explore whether psychometric testing issues, behavioral responses, or forgetting contribute to low persistence--causes that have different welfare implications.

Suggested Citation

  • Andrabi, Tahir & Das, Jishnu & Khwaja, Asim Ijaz & Zajonc, Tristan, 2009. "Here Today, Gone Tomorrow? Examining the Extent and Implications of Low Persistence in Child Learning," Working Paper Series rwp09-001, Harvard University, John F. Kennedy School of Government.
  • Handle: RePEc:ecl:harjfk:rwp09-001
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    Cited by:

    1. Agee, Mark D. & Crocker, Thomas D., 2013. "Operationalizing the capability approach to assessing well-being," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 46(C), pages 80-86.
    2. Mani, Subha & Hoddinott, John & Strauss, John, 2010. "Long-term impact of investments in early schooling," IFPRI discussion papers 981, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    3. Mark D. Agee & Thomas D. Crocker, 2011. "Child Development when Parents Enjoy Childcare," Journal of Institutional and Theoretical Economics (JITE), Mohr Siebeck, Tübingen, vol. 167(2), pages 392-407, June.
    4. Subha Mani & John Hoddinott & John Strauss, 2009. "Long-Term Impact of Investments in Early Schooling – Empirical Evidence from Rural Ethiopia," Fordham Economics Discussion Paper Series dp2009-09, Fordham University, Department of Economics.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • C23 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models
    • H40 - Public Economics - - Publicly Provided Goods - - - General
    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • O12 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Microeconomic Analyses of Economic Development

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