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Calling from the outside: The role of networks in residential mobility

Author

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  • Buechel, Konstantin
  • Puga, Diego
  • Viladecans-Marsal, Elisabet
  • von Ehrlich, Maximilian

Abstract

Using anonymised cellphone data, we study the role of social networks in residential mobility decisions. Individuals with few local contacts are more likely to change residence. Movers strongly prefer places with more of their contacts close-by. Contacts matter because proximity to them is itself valuable and increases the enjoyment of attractive locations. They also provide hard-to-find local information and reduce frictions, especially in home-search. Local contacts who left recently or are more central are particularly influential. As people age, proximity to family gains importance relative to friends.

Suggested Citation

  • Buechel, Konstantin & Puga, Diego & Viladecans-Marsal, Elisabet & von Ehrlich, Maximilian, 2019. "Calling from the outside: The role of networks in residential mobility," CEPR Discussion Papers 13615, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:13615
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    Cited by:

    1. Panle Jia Barwick & Yanyan Liu & Eleonora Patacchini & Qi Wu, 2019. "Information, Mobile Communication, and Referral Effects," NBER Working Papers 25873, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    cellphone data; residential mobility; Social Networks;

    JEL classification:

    • R23 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis - - - Regional Migration; Regional Labor Markets; Population

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