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Who moves? A logit model analysis of inter-provincial migration in Canada

  • Ross Finnie

This paper addresses the topic of inter-provincial migration in terms of the basic question: 'Who moves?'. Panel logit models of the probability that an individual changes his or her province of residence from one year to the next over the 1982-1995 period are estimated using tax-based longitudinal data. It is found that moving is (i) inversely related to the home province's population size, presumably reflecting local economic conditions and labour market scale effects, while language also plays an important role; (ii) more common among residents of smaller cities, towns, and especially rural areas than those in larger cities; (iii) negatively related to age, marriage, and the presence of children for both men and women; (iv) positively related to the provincial unemployment rate, the individuals' receipt of unemployment insurance (except Entry Men), having no market income (except for Entry Men and Entry Women), and the receipt of social assistance (especially for men); (v) (slightly) positively related to earnings levels (beyond the zero earnings point) for prime aged men, but not for others; and (vi) more or less stable over time, with men's rates declining slightly and women's holding steadier or rising slightly, indicating a divergence in trends along gender lines.

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File URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/0003684042000191147
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Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal Applied Economics.

Volume (Year): 36 (2004)
Issue (Month): 16 ()
Pages: 1759-1779

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Handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:36:y:2004:i:16:p:1759-1779
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  1. Osberg, L. & Gordon, D. & Lin, Z., 1992. "Inter-Regional Migration and Inter-Industry Labour Mobility in Canada: A Simultaneous Approach," Department of Economics at Dalhousie University working papers archive 92-08, Dalhousie, Department of Economics.
  2. Chris Robinson & Nigel Tomes, 1982. "Self-Selection and Interprovincial Migration in Canada," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 15(3), pages 474-502, August.
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