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Migration to the agricultural frontier and wealth accumulation, 1860-1870

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  • Stewart, James I.

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  • Stewart, James I., 2006. "Migration to the agricultural frontier and wealth accumulation, 1860-1870," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 43(4), pages 547-577, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:exehis:v:43:y:2006:i:4:p:547-577
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Galenson, David W. & Pope, Clayne L., 1989. "Economic and Geographic Mobility on the Farming Frontier: Evidence from Appanoose County, Iowa, 1850–1870," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 49(03), pages 635-655, September.
    2. Chris Robinson & Nigel Tomes, 1982. "Self-Selection and Interprovincial Migration in Canada," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 15(3), pages 474-502, August.
    3. Libecap, Gary D, 1992. "The Rise of the Chicago Packers and the Origins of Meat Inspection and Antitrust," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 30(2), pages 242-262, April.
    4. Galenson, David W., 1991. "Economic Opportunity on the urban frontier: nativity, work, and wealth in early chicago," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 51(03), pages 581-603, September.
    5. Coelho, Philip R. P. & Shepherd, James F., 1974. "Differences in Regional Prices: The United States, 1851–1880," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 34(03), pages 551-591, September.
    6. Schapiro, Morton Owen, 1982. "Land Availability and Fertility in the United States, 1760–1870," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 42(03), pages 577-600, September.
    7. Schwartz, Aba, 1973. "Interpreting the Effect of Distance on Migration," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 81(5), pages 1153-1169, Sept.-Oct.
    8. Herscovici, Steven, 1998. "Migration and Economic Mobility: Wealth Accumulation and Occupational Change Among Antebellum Migrants and Persisters," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 58(04), pages 927-956, December.
    9. Mincer, Jacob, 1978. "Family Migration Decisions," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 86(5), pages 749-773, October.
    10. Easterlin, Richard A., 1976. "Population Change and Farm Settlement in the Northern United States," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 36(01), pages 45-75, March.
    11. Kearl, J.R. & Pope, Clayne L. & Wimmer, Larry T., 1980. "Household Wealth in a Settlement Economy: Utah, 1850–1870," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 40(03), pages 477-496, September.
    12. Wright, Gavin, 1987. "The Economic Revolution in the American South," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 1(1), pages 161-178, Summer.
    13. Walker, Thomas R., 2000. "Economic Opportunity on the Urban Frontier: Wealth and Nativity in Early San Francisco," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 37(3), pages 258-277, July.
    14. Schaefer, Donald F., 1987. "A model of migration and wealth accumulation: Farmers at the antebellum southern frontier," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 24(2), pages 130-157, April.
    15. Lee, Lung-Fei & Trost, Robert P., 1978. "Estimation of some limited dependent variable models with application to housing demand," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 8(3), pages 357-382, December.
    16. Craig, Lee A., 1991. "The Value of Household Labor in Antebellum Northern Agriculture," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 51(01), pages 67-81, March.
    17. Atack, Jeremy, 1985. "Industrial structure and the emergence of the modern industrial corporation," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 22(1), pages 29-52, January.
    18. Gallaway, Lowell E. & Vedder, Richard K., 1971. "Mobility of Native Americans," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 31(03), pages 613-649, September.
    19. Lee, Lung-Fei, 1978. "Unionism and Wage Rates: A Simultaneous Equations Model with Qualitative and Limited Dependent Variables," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 19(2), pages 415-433, June.
    20. Conley, Timothy G. & Galenson, David W., 1998. "Nativity and Wealth in Mid-Nineteenth-Century Cities," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 58(02), pages 468-493, June.
    21. Gregson, Mary Eschelbach, 1996. "Wealth Accumulation and Distribution in the Midwest in the Late Nineteenth Century," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 33(4), pages 524-538, October.
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    Cited by:

    1. Samuel Bazzi & Martin Fiszbein & Mesay Gebresilasse, 2017. "Frontier Culture: The Roots and Persistence of “Rugged Individualism†in the United States," Boston University - Department of Economics - Working Papers Series WP2018-004, Boston University - Department of Economics.
    2. Scott A. Carson, 2013. "Black and White Body Mass Index Values in Developing 19th Century Nebraska," CESifo Working Paper Series 4268, CESifo Group Munich.
    3. Martin Dribe & Christer Lundh, 2010. "Marriage choices and social reproduction," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 22(14), pages 347-382, March.
    4. Salisbury, Laura, 2014. "Selective migration, wages, and occupational mobility in nineteenth century America," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 53(C), pages 40-63.
    5. Stewart, James I., 2012. "Migration to U.S. frontier cities and job opportunity, 1860–1880," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 49(4), pages 528-542.
    6. Di Matteo, Livio, 2013. "Women, wealth and economic change: An assessment of the impact of women's property law in Wentworth County, Ontario, 1872–1927," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 50(2), pages 285-307.
    7. Javier Silvestre & María Isabel Ayuda & Vicente Pinilla, 2015. "The occupational attainment of migrants and natives in Barcelona, 1930," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 68(3), pages 985-1015, August.
    8. Atack, Jeremy & Coclanis, Peter & Grantham, George, 2009. "Creating Abundance: Biological Innovation and American Agricultural Development--An appreciation and research agenda," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 46(1), pages 160-167, January.

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