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Exploiting the monthly data-flow in structural forecasting

  • Domenico Giannone

    ()

    (Libera Università Internazionale degli Studi Sociali Guido Carli (LUISS)
    Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR))

  • Francesca Monti

    ()

    (Bank of England
    Centre for Macroeconomics (CFM))

  • Lucrezia Reichlin

    ()

    (London Business School (LBS)
    Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR))

This paper shows how and when it is possible to obtain a mapping from a quarterly DSGE model to a monthly specification that maintains the same economic restrictions and has real coefficients. We use this technique to derive the monthly counterpart of the Gali et al (2011) model. We then augment it with auxiliary macro indicators which, because of their timeliness, can be used to obtain a now-cast of the structural model. We show empirical results for the quarterly growth rate of GDP, the monthly unemployment rate and the welfare relevant output gap defined in Gali, Smets and Wouters (2011). Results show that the augmented monthly model does best for now-casting.

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File URL: http://www.centreformacroeconomics.ac.uk/Discussion-Papers/2014/CFMDP2014-16-Paper.pdf
File Function: First version, 2014
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Paper provided by Centre for Macroeconomics (CFM) in its series Discussion Papers with number 1416.

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Length: 23 pages
Date of creation: Jun 2014
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:cfm:wpaper:1416
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.centreformacroeconomics.ac.uk/

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  1. Galí, Jordi & Smets, Frank & Wouters, Rafael, 2011. "Unemployment in an Estimated New Keynesian Model," CEPR Discussion Papers 8401, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
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  8. Domenico Giannone & Martha Banbura & Lucrezia Reichlin, 2008. "Bayesian VARs with large panels," ULB Institutional Repository 2013/13388, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
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  10. Bernanke, Ben S. & Gertler, Mark & Gilchrist, Simon, 1999. "The financial accelerator in a quantitative business cycle framework," Handbook of Macroeconomics, in: J. B. Taylor & M. Woodford (ed.), Handbook of Macroeconomics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 21, pages 1341-1393 Elsevier.
  11. Domenico Giannone & Lucrezia Reichlin & David H. Small, 2005. "Nowcasting GDP and inflation: the real-time informational content of macroeconomic data releases," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2005-42, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  12. Frank Smets & Raf Wouters, 2007. "Shocks and Frictions in US Business Cycles : a Bayesian DSGE Approach," Working Paper Research 109, National Bank of Belgium.
  13. Alejandro Justiniano & Giorgio E. Primiceri & Andrea Tambalotti, 2008. "Investment shocks and business cycles," Working Paper Series WP-08-12, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago.
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  16. Červená, Marianna & Schneider, Martin, 2014. "Short-term forecasting of GDP with a DSGE model augmented by monthly indicators," International Journal of Forecasting, Elsevier, vol. 30(3), pages 498-516.
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  18. Elena Angelini & Gonzalo Camba-Mendez & Domenico Giannone & Lucrezia Reichlin & Gerhard Rünstler, 2008. "Short-Term Forecasts of Euro Area GDP Growth," Working Papers ECARES ECARES 2008-035, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
  19. Lawrence J. Christiano & Martin S. Eichenbaum & Mathias Trabandt, 2015. "Understanding the Great Recession," American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 7(1), pages 110-67, January.
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  21. Bent Jesper Christensen & Olaf Posch & Michel van der Wel, 2011. "Estimating Dynamic Equilibrium Models using Macro and Financial Data," CREATES Research Papers 2011-21, Department of Economics and Business Economics, Aarhus University.
  22. Sims, Christopher A, 2002. "Solving Linear Rational Expectations Models," Computational Economics, Society for Computational Economics, vol. 20(1-2), pages 1-20, October.
  23. Marianna Cervená & Martin Schneider, 2010. "Short-term forecasting GDP with a DSGE model augmented by monthly indicators," Working Papers 163, Oesterreichische Nationalbank (Austrian Central Bank).
  24. Francesca Monti, 2010. "Combining Judgment and Models," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 42(8), pages 1641-1662, December.
  25. Julio Rotemberg & Michael Woodford, 1997. "An Optimization-Based Econometric Framework for the Evaluation of Monetary Policy," NBER Chapters, in: NBER Macroeconomics Annual 1997, Volume 12, pages 297-361 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  26. Christoffel, Kai & Coenen, Günter & Warne, Anders, 2008. "The New Area-Wide Model of the euro area: a micro-founded open-economy model for forecasting and policy analysis," Working Paper Series 0944, European Central Bank.
  27. Jing Cynthia Wu & Fan Dora Xia, 2014. "Measuring the Macroeconomic Impact of Monetary Policy at the Zero Lower Bound," NBER Working Papers 20117, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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