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Qian Weng

Personal Details

First Name:Qian
Middle Name:
Last Name:Weng
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pwe240
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]

Affiliation

School of Labor and Human Resources
Renmin University of China

Beijing, China
http://slhr.ruc.edu.cn/




RePEc:edi:slruccn (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Haoran He & David Neumark & Qian Weng, 2019. "Do Workers Value Flexible Jobs? A Field Experiment," NBER Working Papers 25423, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Haoran He & David Neumark & Qian Weng, 2019. "Do Workers Value Flexible Jobs? A Field Experiment on Compensating Differentials," Natural Field Experiments 00667, The Field Experiments Website.
  3. Weng, Qian, 2013. "Session Size and its Effect on Identity Building: Evidence from a public goods experiment," Working Papers in Economics 560, University of Gothenburg, Department of Economics.
  4. Söderbom, Måns & Weng, Qian, 2012. "Multi-product firms, product mix changes and upgrading: Evidence from China's state-owned forest areas," Working Papers in Economics 525, University of Gothenburg, Department of Economics.

Articles

  1. Weng, Qian & Gao, Xia & He, Haoran & Li, Shi, 2019. "Family size, birth order and educational attainment: Evidence from China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 57(C).
  2. Weng, Qian & Söderbom, Måns, 2018. "Is R&D cash flow sensitive? Evidence from Chinese industrial firms," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 47(C), pages 77-95.
  3. Weng, Qian & Carlsson, Fredrik, 2015. "Cooperation in teams: The role of identity, punishment, and endowment distribution," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 126(C), pages 25-38.
  4. Söderbom, Måns & Weng, Qian, 2012. "Multi-product firms, product mix changes and upgrading: Evidence from China's state-owned forest areas," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 23(4), pages 801-818.
  5. He, Haoran & Weng, Qian, 2012. "Ownership, autonomy, incentives and efficiency: Evidence from the forest product processing industry in China," Journal of Forest Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(3), pages 177-193.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Haoran He & David Neumark & Qian Weng, 2019. "Do Workers Value Flexible Jobs? A Field Experiment," NBER Working Papers 25423, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    Cited by:

    1. Clemens, Jeffrey, 2019. "Making Sense of the Minimum Wage: A Roadmap for Navigating Recent Research," MPRA Paper 94324, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Viete, Steffen & Erdsiek, Daniel, 2020. "Mobile Information Technologies and Firm Performance: The Role of Employee Autonomy," Information Economics and Policy, Elsevier, vol. 51(C).
    3. Arntz, Melanie & Ben Yahmed, Sarra & Berlingieri, Francesco, 2019. "Working from home: Heterogeneous effects on hours worked and wages," ZEW Discussion Papers 19-015, ZEW - Leibniz Centre for European Economic Research.
    4. Pabilonia, Sabrina Wulff & Vernon, Victoria, 2020. "Telework and Time Use in the United States," GLO Discussion Paper Series 546, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
    5. Kuan-Ming Chen & Claire Ding & John A. List & Magne Mogstad, 2020. "Reservation Wages and Workers’ Valuation of Job Flexibility: Evidence from a Natural Field Experiment," NBER Working Papers 27807, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

  2. Haoran He & David Neumark & Qian Weng, 2019. "Do Workers Value Flexible Jobs? A Field Experiment on Compensating Differentials," Natural Field Experiments 00667, The Field Experiments Website.

    Cited by:

    1. Clemens, Jeffrey, 2019. "Making Sense of the Minimum Wage: A Roadmap for Navigating Recent Research," MPRA Paper 94324, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Alexandre Mas & Amanda Pallais, 2020. "Alternative Work Arrangements," NBER Working Papers 26605, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Arntz, Melanie & Ben Yahmed, Sarra & Berlingieri, Francesco, 2019. "Working from home: Heterogeneous effects on hours worked and wages," ZEW Discussion Papers 19-015, ZEW - Leibniz Centre for European Economic Research.
    4. Pabilonia, Sabrina Wulff & Vernon, Victoria, 2020. "Telework and Time Use in the United States," GLO Discussion Paper Series 546, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
    5. Kuan-Ming Chen & Claire Ding & John A. List & Magne Mogstad, 2020. "Reservation Wages and Workers’ Valuation of Job Flexibility: Evidence from a Natural Field Experiment," NBER Working Papers 27807, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

  3. Weng, Qian, 2013. "Session Size and its Effect on Identity Building: Evidence from a public goods experiment," Working Papers in Economics 560, University of Gothenburg, Department of Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Antonio Filippin & Carlo V. Fiorio & Eliana Viviano, 2013. "The effect of tax enforcement on tax morale," Temi di discussione (Economic working papers) 937, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.

  4. Söderbom, Måns & Weng, Qian, 2012. "Multi-product firms, product mix changes and upgrading: Evidence from China's state-owned forest areas," Working Papers in Economics 525, University of Gothenburg, Department of Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Becker, Dennis, 2014. "Informality among multi-product firms," Working Papers 250009, Cornell University, Department of Applied Economics and Management.
    2. Lionel Fontagné & Angelo Secchi & Chiara Tomasi, 2016. "The Fickle Fringe and the Stable Core: Exporters' Product Mix Across Markets," Université Paris1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Post-Print and Working Papers) hal-01315601, HAL.
    3. T.V.S.Ramamohan Rao, 2011. "Contemporary Relevance and Ongoing Controversies Related to the CES Production Function," Journal of Quantitative Economics, The Indian Econometric Society, vol. 9(2), pages 36-57, July.

Articles

  1. Weng, Qian & Gao, Xia & He, Haoran & Li, Shi, 2019. "Family size, birth order and educational attainment: Evidence from China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 57(C).

    Cited by:

    1. Juan Chaparro & Aaron Sojourner & Matthew Wiswall, 2020. "Early Childhood Care and Cognitive Development," Working Papers 2020-012, Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group.

  2. Weng, Qian & Söderbom, Måns, 2018. "Is R&D cash flow sensitive? Evidence from Chinese industrial firms," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 47(C), pages 77-95.

    Cited by:

    1. Langzi Chen & Zhihong Chen & Jian Li, 2019. "Can Trade Credit Maintain Sustainable R&D Investment of SMEs?—Evidence from China," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 11(3), pages 1-16, February.
    2. Carlos Alano Soares de Almeida & Jansen Maia Del Corso & Leonardo Andrade Rocha & Wesley Vieira da Silva & Claudimar Pereira da Veiga, 2019. "Innovation and Performance: The Impact of Investments in R&D According to the Different Levels of Productivity of Firms," International Journal of Innovation and Technology Management (IJITM), World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd., vol. 16(05), pages 1-21, August.
    3. Suzuki, Keishun, 2020. "Patent Puzzle, Inflation, and Internal Financial Constraint," MPRA Paper 101937, University Library of Munich, Germany.

  3. Weng, Qian & Carlsson, Fredrik, 2015. "Cooperation in teams: The role of identity, punishment, and endowment distribution," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 126(C), pages 25-38.

    Cited by:

    1. Gangadharan, Lata & Nikiforakis, Nikos & Villeval, Marie Claire, 2015. "Equality Concerns and the Limits of Self-Governance in Heterogeneous Populations," IZA Discussion Papers 9384, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    2. van Leeuwen, Boris & Ramalingam, Abhijit & Rojo Arjona, David & Schram, Arthur, 2019. "Centrality and cooperation in networks," Other publications TiSEM b668e3a4-b5a5-49f0-a7fe-c, Tilburg University, School of Economics and Management.
    3. Nives Della Valle & Matteo Ploner, 2016. "Reacting to Unfairness: Group Identity and Dishonest Behavior," CEEL Working Papers 1607, Cognitive and Experimental Economics Laboratory, Department of Economics, University of Trento, Italia.
    4. Bicskei, Marianna & Lankau, Matthias & Bizer, Kilian, 2014. "How peer-punishment affects cooperativeness in homogeneous and heterogeneous groups: A public goods experiment with social identity," Center for European, Governance and Economic Development Research Discussion Papers 200, University of Goettingen, Department of Economics.
    5. Gangadharan, Lata & Grossman, Philip J. & Molle, Mana Komai & Vecci, Joe, 2019. "Impact of social identity and inequality on antisocial behaviour," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 119(C), pages 199-215.
    6. Gangadharan, Lata & Nikiforakis, Nikos & Villeval, Marie Claire, 2017. "Normative conflict and the limits of self-governance in heterogeneous populations," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 100(C), pages 143-156.
    7. Daniel Brent & Lata Gangadharan & Anca Mihut & Marie Claire Villeval, 2019. "Taxation, redistribution and observability in social dilemmas," Post-Print halshs-01930721, HAL.
    8. Andrea F. M. Martinangeli, 2017. "Do What (You Think) the Rich Will Do: Inequality and Belief Heterogeneity in Public Good Provision," Working Papers tax-mpg-rps-2017-06_4, Max Planck Institute for Tax Law and Public Finance.
    9. Fabian Paetzel & Rupert Sausgruber, 2018. "Cognitive Ability and In-group Bias: An Experimental Study," Department of Economics Working Papers wuwp265, Vienna University of Economics and Business, Department of Economics.
    10. Pan, Xiaofei & Houser, Daniel, 2019. "Why trust out-groups? The role of punishment under uncertainty," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 158(C), pages 236-254.
    11. Jie Hou & Baizhou Li, 2020. "The Evolutionary Game for Collaborative Innovation of the IoT Industry under Government Leadership in China: An IoT Infrastructure Perspective," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 12(9), pages 1-21, May.
    12. Kok, Lucille & Oosterbaan, Veerle & Stoker, Hester & Vyrastekova, Jana, 2020. "In-group favouritism and social norms: Public goods experiments in Tanzania," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 85(C).
    13. Horstmann, Elaine & Blankenberg, Ann-Kathrin & Schneider, Tim, 2017. "Cooperation in public goods games: Enhancing effects of group identity and competition," Center for European, Governance and Economic Development Research Discussion Papers 324, University of Goettingen, Department of Economics.
    14. Grund, Christian & Harbring, Christine & Thommes, Kirsten & Tilkes, Katja Rebecca, 2019. "Decisions on Extending Group Membership: Evidence from a Public Good Experiment," IZA Discussion Papers 12513, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    15. Paetzel, Fabian & Sausgruber, Rupert, 2017. "Entitlements and Loyalty in Groups: An Experimental Study," Annual Conference 2017 (Vienna): Alternative Structures for Money and Banking 168224, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.

  4. Söderbom, Måns & Weng, Qian, 2012. "Multi-product firms, product mix changes and upgrading: Evidence from China's state-owned forest areas," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 23(4), pages 801-818.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  5. He, Haoran & Weng, Qian, 2012. "Ownership, autonomy, incentives and efficiency: Evidence from the forest product processing industry in China," Journal of Forest Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(3), pages 177-193.

    Cited by:

    1. Zhu, Hongge & Hu, Shilei & Ren, Yue & Ma, Xing & Cao, Yukun, 2017. "Determinants of engagement in non-timber forest products (NTFPs) business activities: A study on worker households in the forest areas of Daxinganling and Xiaoxinganling Mountains, northeastern China," Forest Policy and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 80(C), pages 125-132.
    2. Huang, Wei, 2019. "Forest condition change, tenure reform, and government-funded eco-environmental programs in Northeast China," Forest Policy and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 98(C), pages 67-74.
    3. Chen, Jiandong & Wu, Yinyin & Song, Malin & Zhu, Zunhong, 2017. "Stochastic frontier analysis of productive efficiency in China's Forestry Industry," Journal of Forest Economics, Elsevier, vol. 28(C), pages 87-95.
    4. Lin, Benxi & Du, Ruiying & Dong, Zekuan & Jin, Shaosheng & Liu, Weipin, 2020. "The impact of foreign direct investment on the productivity of the Chinese forest products industry," Forest Policy and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 111(C).

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 3 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-EXP: Experimental Economics (3) 2013-03-16 2019-01-14 2019-03-25. Author is listed
  2. NEP-HRM: Human Capital & Human Resource Management (2) 2019-01-14 2019-03-25. Author is listed
  3. NEP-LTV: Unemployment, Inequality & Poverty (2) 2019-01-14 2019-03-25. Author is listed
  4. NEP-CBE: Cognitive & Behavioural Economics (1) 2013-03-16. Author is listed
  5. NEP-LAB: Labour Economics (1) 2019-01-14. Author is listed

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