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Centrality and cooperation in networks

Author

Listed:
  • Boris Leeuwen

    () (Tilburg University)

  • Abhijit Ramalingam

    () (Appalachian State University)

  • David Rojo Arjona

    () (Chapman University)

  • Arthur Schram

    () (University of Amsterdam)

Abstract

Abstract We investigate the effects of centrality on cooperation in groups. Players with centrality keep a group together by having a pivotal position in a network. In some of our experimental treatments, players can vote to exclude others and prevent them from further participation in the group. We find that, in the presence of exclusion, central players contribute significantly less than others, and that this is tolerated by those others. Because of this tolerance, groups with centrality manage to maintain high levels of cooperation.

Suggested Citation

  • Boris Leeuwen & Abhijit Ramalingam & David Rojo Arjona & Arthur Schram, 2019. "Centrality and cooperation in networks," Experimental Economics, Springer;Economic Science Association, vol. 22(1), pages 178-196, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:expeco:v:22:y:2019:i:1:d:10.1007_s10683-018-9592-1
    DOI: 10.1007/s10683-018-9592-1
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Ramalingam, Abhijit & Stoddard, Brock V. & Walker, James M., 2019. "The market for talent: Competition for resources and self-governance in teams," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 114(C), pages 268-284.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Cooperation; Centrality; Public goods; Networks;

    JEL classification:

    • C91 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - Laboratory, Individual Behavior
    • D02 - Microeconomics - - General - - - Institutions: Design, Formation, Operations, and Impact
    • D03 - Microeconomics - - General - - - Behavioral Microeconomics: Underlying Principles
    • H41 - Public Economics - - Publicly Provided Goods - - - Public Goods

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