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Jonathan Schwabish

Personal Details

First Name:Jonathan
Middle Name:
Last Name:Schwabish
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:psc856
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]
http://policyviz.com/
Twitter: @jschwabish

Affiliation

Urban Institute

Washington, District of Columbia (United States)
http://www.urban.org/

: (202) 833-7200
202-463-8522
2100 M Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20037
RePEc:edi:urbanus (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles Books

Working papers

  1. Schwabish, Jonathan, 2018. "Categorizing and Ranking Graphs in the American Economic Review Over the Last Century," OSF Preprints rakpy, Center for Open Science.
  2. Jonathan A. Schwabish & Julie H. Topoleski, 2013. "Modeling Individual Earnings in CBO’s Long-Term Microsimulation Model: Working Paper 2013-04," Working Papers 44306, Congressional Budget Office.
  3. Molly Dahl & Thomas DeLeire & Jonathan Schwabish & Timothy Smeeding, 2012. "The Earned Income Tax Credit and Expected Social Security Retirement Benefits Among Low-Income Women: Working Paper 2012-06," Working Papers 43033, Congressional Budget Office.
  4. Jonathan A. Schwabish, 2009. "Identifying Rates of Emigration in the United States Using Administrative Earnings Records: Working Paper 2009-01," Working Papers 20516, Congressional Budget Office.
  5. Dahl, Molly & DeLeire, Thomas & Schwabish, Jonathan, 2009. "Stepping Stone or Dead End? The Effect of the EITC on Earnings Growth," IZA Discussion Papers 4146, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
  6. Julian Cristia & Jonathan A. Schwabish, 2007. "Measurement Error in the SIPP: Evidence from Matched Administrative Records: Working Paper 2007-03," Working Papers 18322, Congressional Budget Office.
  7. Jonathan A. Schwabish, 2006. "Earnings Inequality and High Earners: Changes During and after the Stock Market Boom of the 1990s: Working Paper 2006-06," Working Papers 17738, Congressional Budget Office.
  8. R. Haveman & Schwabish J., "undated". "Macroeconomic Performance and the Poverty Rate: A Return to Normalcy?," Institute for Research on Poverty Discussion Papers 1187-99, University of Wisconsin Institute for Research on Poverty.

Articles

  1. Jonathan A. Schwabish, 2014. "An Economist's Guide to Visualizing Data," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 28(1), pages 209-234, Winter.
  2. Jonathan A. Schwabish & Brian Lucking & Mary C. Daly, 2013. "The future of Social Security Disability Insurance," FRBSF Economic Letter, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, issue june24.
  3. Molly Dahl & Thomas DeLeire & Jonathan A. Schwabish, 2011. "Estimates of Year-to-Year Volatility in Earnings and in Household Incomes from Administrative, Survey, and Matched Data," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 46(4), pages 750-774.
  4. Manchester, Joyce & Schwabish, Jonathan A., 2010. "The Long-Term Budget Outlook in the United States and the Role of Health Care Entitlements," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association;National Tax Journal, vol. 63(2), pages 285-305, June.
  5. Dahl, Molly & DeLeire, Thomas & Schwabish, Jonathan, 2009. "Stepping Stone or Dead End? The Effect of the EITC on Earnings Growth," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association;National Tax Journal, vol. 62(2), pages 329-346, June.
  6. Schwabish, Jonathan A. & Topoleski, Julie H., 2009. "Risk tolerance and retirement income composition," Journal of Pension Economics and Finance, Cambridge University Press, vol. 8(2), pages 131-151, April.
  7. Jonathan A. Schwabish, 2008. "The Effects of Earnings Inequality on State Social Spending in the United States," Public Finance Review, , vol. 36(5), pages 588-613, September.
  8. Schwabish, Jonathan A. & Topoleski, Julie & Tristao, Ignez, 2007. "Can America Afford to Get Sick?," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association;National Tax Journal, vol. 60(3), pages 407-418, September.
  9. Barbara Wolfe & Robert Haveman & Karen Pence & Jonathan Schwabish, 2007. "Do youth nonmarital childbearing choices reflect income and relationship expectations?," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 20(1), pages 73-100, February.
  10. Jonathan A. Schwabish, 2005. "Estimating Employment Spillover Effects In New York City with an Application to The Stock Transfer Tax," Public Finance Review, , vol. 33(6), pages 663-689, November.
  11. Jonathan A. Schwabish, 2005. "Regulating Underground Industry: An Economic Analysis of Sports Betting," New York Economic Review, New York State Economics Association (NYSEA), vol. 36(1), pages 65-77.
  12. R Haveman & J Schwabish, 2000. "Has Macroeconomic Performance Regained Its Antipoverty Bite?," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 18(4), pages 415-427, October.

Books

  1. Robert H. Haveman & Andrew Bershadker & Jonathan A. Schwabish, 2003. "Human Capital in the United States from 1975 to 2000: Patterns of Growth and Utilization," Books from Upjohn Press, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research, number hcus, july-dece.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Dahl, Molly & DeLeire, Thomas & Schwabish, Jonathan, 2009. "Stepping Stone or Dead End? The Effect of the EITC on Earnings Growth," IZA Discussion Papers 4146, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).

    Cited by:

    1. Melanie Guldi & Lucie Schmidt, 2017. "Taxes, Transfers, and Women’s Labor Supply in the United States," Working Papers 2017-01, University of Central Florida, Department of Economics.
    2. Natasha Pilkauskas & Katherine Michelmore, 2019. "The Effect of the Earned Income Tax Credit on Housing and Living Arrangements," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 56(4), pages 1303-1326, August.
    3. David Neumark, 2016. "Policy levers to increase jobs and increase income from work after the Great Recession," IZA Journal of Labor Policy, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 5(1), pages 1-38, December.
    4. H. Shaefer & Xiaoqing Song & Trina Williams Shanks, 2013. "Do single mothers in the United States use the Earned Income Tax Credit to reduce unsecured debt?," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 11(4), pages 659-680, December.

  2. Julian Cristia & Jonathan A. Schwabish, 2007. "Measurement Error in the SIPP: Evidence from Matched Administrative Records: Working Paper 2007-03," Working Papers 18322, Congressional Budget Office.

    Cited by:

    1. Dahl, Molly & DeLeire, Thomas & Schwabish, Jonathan, 2009. "Stepping Stone or Dead End? The Effect of the EITC on Earnings Growth," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association;National Tax Journal, vol. 62(2), pages 329-346, June.
    2. Richard W. Johnson & Melissa M. Favreault & Corina Mommaerts, 2009. "Work Ability and the Social Insurance Safety Net in the Years Prior to Retirement," Working Papers, Center for Retirement Research at Boston College wp2009-28, Center for Retirement Research, revised Nov 2009.
    3. Molly Dahl & Thomas DeLeire & Jonathan Schwabish & Timothy Smeeding, 2012. "The Earned Income Tax Credit and Expected Social Security Retirement Benefits Among Low-Income Women: Working Paper 2012-06," Working Papers 43033, Congressional Budget Office.
    4. Gutknecht, Daniel, 2011. "Nonclassical Measurement Error in a Nonlinear (Duration) Model," Economic Research Papers 270763, University of Warwick - Department of Economics.

  3. R. Haveman & Schwabish J., "undated". "Macroeconomic Performance and the Poverty Rate: A Return to Normalcy?," Institute for Research on Poverty Discussion Papers 1187-99, University of Wisconsin Institute for Research on Poverty.

    Cited by:

    1. Yolanda Kodrzycki, 2000. "Discouraged and other marginally attached workers: evidence on their role in the labor market," New England Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, issue may, pages 35-40.
    2. Katharine L. Bradbury, 2000. "Rising tide in the labor market: to what degree do expansions benefit the disadvantaged?," New England Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, issue may, pages 3-33.

Articles

  1. Jonathan A. Schwabish, 2014. "An Economist's Guide to Visualizing Data," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 28(1), pages 209-234, Winter.

    Cited by:

    1. David Aikman & Michael T. Kiley & Seung Jung Lee & Michael G. Palumbo & Missaka Warusawitharana, 2015. "Mapping Heat in the U.S. Financial System," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2015-59, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    2. Christensen, Garret & Miguel, Edward & Sturdy, Jennifer, 2017. "Transparency, Reproducibility, and the Credibility of Economics Research," MetaArXiv 9a3rw, Center for Open Science.
    3. Garret S. Christensen & Edward Miguel, 2016. "Transparency, Reproducibility, and the Credibility of Economics Research," NBER Working Papers 22989, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Mark D. Flood & Victoria L. Lemieux & Margaret Varga & B.L. William Wong, 2014. "The Application of Visual Analytics to Financial Stability Monitoring," Working Papers 14-02, Office of Financial Research, US Department of the Treasury, revised 07 Oct 2014.
    5. Knittel Christopher R. & Metaxoglou Konstantinos, 2018. "Working with Data: Two Empiricists’ Experience," Journal of Econometric Methods, De Gruyter, vol. 7(1), pages 1-12, January.
    6. Luc Bissonnette & Arthur van Soest, 2015. "The Financial Crisis and Consumers' Income and Pension Expectations," Cahiers de recherche 1502, Chaire de recherche Industrielle Alliance sur les enjeux économiques des changements démographiques.
    7. Tomasz Kopczewski, 2015. "Think not calculate! Implementation of Felix Klein postulates in economic education with CAS software," Working Papers 2015-38, Faculty of Economic Sciences, University of Warsaw.
    8. Ronald Heijmans & Richard Heuver & Clement Levallois & Iman van Lelyveld, 2014. "Dynamic visualization of large transaction networks: the daily Dutch overnight money market," DNB Working Papers 418, Netherlands Central Bank, Research Department.
    9. Kinsella, Stephen, 2019. "Visualising economic crises using accounting models," Accounting, Organizations and Society, Elsevier, vol. 75(C), pages 1-16.

  2. Molly Dahl & Thomas DeLeire & Jonathan A. Schwabish, 2011. "Estimates of Year-to-Year Volatility in Earnings and in Household Incomes from Administrative, Survey, and Matched Data," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 46(4), pages 750-774.

    Cited by:

    1. Bruce D. Meyer & Nikolas Mittag, 2015. "Using Linked Survey and Administrative Data to Better Measure Income: Implications for Poverty, Program Effectiveness and Holes in the Safety Net," Working Papers 15-35, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.
    2. Regina T. Riphahn & Daniel Schnitzlein, 2011. "Wage Mobility in East and West Germany," Working Papers 114, Bavarian Graduate Program in Economics (BGPE).
    3. Meyer, Bruce D. & Mittag, Nikolas, 2017. "Using Linked Survey and Administrative Data to Better Measure Income: Implications for Poverty, Program Effectiveness and Holes in the Safety Net," IZA Discussion Papers 10943, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    4. Robert A. Moffitt & Sisi Zhang, 2018. "Income Volatility and the PSID: Past Research and New Results," NBER Working Papers 24390, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Bruce D. Meyer & Derek Wu, 2018. "The Poverty Reduction of Social Security and Means-Tested Transfers," NBER Working Papers 24567, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Stephan Whitaker, 2015. "Big Data versus a Survey," Working Papers (Old Series) 1440, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, revised 07 Jan 2015.
    7. Bradley Hardy & James P. Ziliak, 2014. "Decomposing Trends In Income Volatility: The “Wild Ride” At The Top And Bottom," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 52(1), pages 459-476, January.
    8. Böckerman, Petri & Bryson, Alex & Viinikainen, Jutta & Hakulinen, Christian & Pulkki-Raback, Laura & Raitakari, Olli, 2014. "Biomarkers and Long-term Labour Market Outcomes: The Case of Creatine," IZA Discussion Papers 8029, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    9. Böckerman, Petri & Vainiomäki, Jari, 2013. "Stature and Life-Time Labor Market Outcomes: Accounting for Unobserved Differences," IZA Discussion Papers 7424, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    10. Markus Jantti & Stephen P. Jenkins, 2014. "Income Mobility," Working Papers 319, ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality.
    11. Lisa Gennetian & Sharon Wolf & Heather Hill & Pamela Morris, 2015. "Intrayear Household Income Dynamics and Adolescent School Behavior," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 52(2), pages 455-483, April.
    12. Sisi Zhang, 2014. "Wage shocks, household labor supply, and income instability," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 27(3), pages 767-796, July.
    13. Bradley Hardy, 2014. "Childhood Income Volatility and Adult Outcomes," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 51(5), pages 1641-1665, October.
    14. Chauvel Louis & Hartung Anne & Palmisano Flaviana, 2019. "Dynamics of Individual Income Rank Volatility: Evidence from West Germany and the US," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 19(2), pages 1-22, April.
    15. Paula Garda & Volker Ziemann, 2014. "Economic Policies and Microeconomic Stability: A Literature Review and Some Empirics," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 1115, OECD Publishing.
    16. Cappellari, Lorenzo & Jenkins, Stephen P., 2013. "Earnings and labour market volatility in Britain," ISER Working Paper Series 2013-10, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    17. Lorenzo Cappellari & Marco Leonardi, 2016. "Earnings Instability and Tenure," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 118(2), pages 202-234, April.
    18. Necker, Sarah & Voskort, Andrea, 2014. "Intergenerational transmission of risk attitudes – A revealed preference approach," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 65(C), pages 66-89.
    19. Manasi Deshpande, 2016. "Does Welfare Inhibit Success? The Long-Term Effects of Removing Low-Income Youth from the Disability Rolls," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 106(11), pages 3300-3330, November.
    20. Cappellari, Lorenzo & Jenkins, Stephen P., 2014. "Earnings and labour market volatility in Britain, with a transatlantic comparison," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 57302, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    21. Meyer, Bruce D. & Mittag, Nikolas, 2019. "Combining Administrative and Survey Data to Improve Income Measurement," IZA Discussion Papers 12266, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    22. Shane T. Jensen & Stephen H. Shore, 2015. "Changes in the Distribution of Earnings Volatility," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 50(3), pages 811-836.
    23. Bruce Meyer & Nikolas Mittag, 2017. "Using Linked Survey and Administrative Data to Better Measure Income: Implications for Poverty, Program Effectiveness and Holes in the Safety Net," Working Papers 2017-075, Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group.
    24. Karen E. Dynan & Douglas W. Elmendorf & Daniel E. Sichel, 2007. "The evolution of household income volatility," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2007-61, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    25. Petri Bockerman & Alex Bryson & Christian Hakulinen & Jaakko Pehkonen & Laura Pulkki-Raback & Olli Raitakari & Jutta Viinikainen, 2014. "Biomarkers and Long-term Market Outcomes: The Case of Creatine," CEP Discussion Papers dp1279, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    26. Louis Chauvel & Anne Hartung & Flaviana Palmisano, 2017. "Dynamics of Income Rank Volatility: Evidence from Germany and the US," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 926, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    27. Key, Nigel & Prager, Daniel & Burns, Christopher, 2017. "Farm Household Income Volatility: An Analysis Using Panel Data From a National Survey," Economic Research Report 256710, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
    28. Marco Leonardi, 2017. "Job Mobility And Earnings Instability," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 55(1), pages 260-280, January.
    29. Bilal Habib, 2018. "How CBO Adjusts for Survey Underreporting of Transfer Income in Its Distributional Analyses: Working Paper 2018-07," Working Papers 54234, Congressional Budget Office.

  3. Dahl, Molly & DeLeire, Thomas & Schwabish, Jonathan, 2009. "Stepping Stone or Dead End? The Effect of the EITC on Earnings Growth," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association;National Tax Journal, vol. 62(2), pages 329-346, June.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  4. Jonathan A. Schwabish, 2008. "The Effects of Earnings Inequality on State Social Spending in the United States," Public Finance Review, , vol. 36(5), pages 588-613, September.

    Cited by:

    1. Kosec, Katrina, 2014. "Relying on the private sector: The income distribution and public investments in the poor," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 107(C), pages 320-342.

  5. Barbara Wolfe & Robert Haveman & Karen Pence & Jonathan Schwabish, 2007. "Do youth nonmarital childbearing choices reflect income and relationship expectations?," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 20(1), pages 73-100, February.

    Cited by:

    1. Lindvall, Lars, 2009. "Neighbourhoods, economic incentives and post compulsory education choices," Working Paper Series 2009:11, IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy.
    2. Cygan-Rehm, Kamila & Riphahn, Regina T., 2014. "Teenage Pregnancies and Births in Germany: Patterns and Developments," IZA Discussion Papers 8229, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    3. Marcén, Miriam & Bellido, Héctor, 2013. "Teen Mothers and Culture," MPRA Paper 44712, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Mariana Alfonso, 2008. "Las chicas sólo quieren divertirse? Sexualidad, embarazo y maternidad en las adolecentes de Bolivia," Research Department Publications 4539, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
    5. Favara, Marta & Sanchez, Alan, 2016. "Psychosocial Competencies and Risky Behaviours in Peru," IZA Discussion Papers 10260, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    6. Jason M. Fletcher & Barbara L. Wolfe, 2008. "Education and Labor Market Consequences of Teenage Childbearing: Evidence Using the Timing of Pregnancy Outcomes and Community Fixed Effects," CEPR Discussion Papers 573, Centre for Economic Policy Research, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.
    7. Kruger, Diana & Berthelon, Matias, 2009. "Delaying the Bell: The Effects of Longer School Days on Adolescent Motherhood in Chile," IZA Discussion Papers 4553, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    8. Mariana Alfonso, 2008. "Girls Just Want to Have Fun? Sexuality, Pregnancy, and Motherhood among Bolivian Teenagers," Research Department Publications 4538, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
    9. Poh Lin Tan, 2017. "The impact of school entry laws on female education and teenage fertility," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 30(2), pages 503-536, April.
    10. Jason Fletcher, 2012. "The effects of teenage childbearing on the short- and long-term health behaviors of mothers," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 25(1), pages 201-218, January.

  6. R Haveman & J Schwabish, 2000. "Has Macroeconomic Performance Regained Its Antipoverty Bite?," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 18(4), pages 415-427, October.

    Cited by:

    1. Luis Ayala & Olga Cantó & Juan G. Rodríguez, 2011. "Poverty and the business cycle: The role of the intra-household distribution of unemployment," Working Papers 222, ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality.
    2. Donald G. Freeman, 2003. "Trickling Down the Rising Tide: New Estimates of the Link between Poverty and the Macroeconomy," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 70(2), pages 359-373, October.
    3. Steven Shulman, 2001. "Family structure and the afro-euro poverty gap: When employment policies aren't enough," The Review of Black Political Economy, Springer;National Economic Association, vol. 29(2), pages 47-66, December.
    4. Berthold, Norbert & Brunner, Alexander & Zenzen, Jupp, 2010. "Makroökonomische Rahmenbedingungen und die Einkommensverteilung: Welchen Einfluss hat die Finanzkrise?," Discussion Paper Series 108, Julius Maximilian University of Würzburg, Chair of Economic Order and Social Policy.
    5. Robert H. DeFina, 2002. "The impact of unemployment on alternative poverty measures," Working Papers 02-8, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia, revised 2002.
    6. Carlos Gradín & Olga Cantó & Coral Río, 2017. "Measuring employment deprivation in the EU using a household-level index," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 15(2), pages 639-667, June.
    7. Abd Azis Muthalib & Pasrun Adam & Rostin Rostin & Zainuddin Saenong & La Ode Suriadi, 2018. "The Influence of Fuel Prices and Unemployment Rate towards the Poverty Level in Indonesia," International Journal of Energy Economics and Policy, Econjournals, vol. 8(3), pages 37-42.
    8. Francisco Parro G. & Loreto Reyes R., 2019. "Economic growth and the Chilean labor market," Journal Economía Chilena (The Chilean Economy), Central Bank of Chile, vol. 22(2), pages 070-095, August.
    9. Carlos Gradin & Olga Canto & Coral del Rio, 2012. "Measuring employment deprivation among households in the EU," Working Papers 247, ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality.
    10. Shatakshee Dhongde & Robert Haveman, 2017. "Multi-Dimensional Deprivation in the U.S," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 133(2), pages 477-500, September.
    11. Tindara Addabbo & Rosa García-Fernández & Carmen Llorca-Rodríguez & Anna Maccagnan, 2013. "The effect of the crisis on material deprivation in Italy and Spain," Department of Economics (DEMB) 0019, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Department of Economics "Marco Biagi".
    12. Luis Ayala & Olga Cantó & Juan G. Rodríguez, 2017. "Poverty and the business cycle: A regional panel data analysis for Spain using alternative measures of unemployment," The Journal of Economic Inequality, Springer;Society for the Study of Economic Inequality, vol. 15(1), pages 47-73, March.
    13. Donald G. Freeman, 2003. "Poverty and the Macroeconomy: Estimates from U.S. Regional Data," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 21(3), pages 358-371, July.
    14. Natasha V. Pilkauskas & Janet Currie & Irwin Garfinkel, 2011. "The Great Recession and Material Hardship," Working Papers 1312, Princeton University, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Center for Research on Child Wellbeing..

Books

  1. Robert H. Haveman & Andrew Bershadker & Jonathan A. Schwabish, 2003. "Human Capital in the United States from 1975 to 2000: Patterns of Growth and Utilization," Books from Upjohn Press, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research, number hcus, july-dece.

    Cited by:

    1. Mark Huggett & Greg Kaplan, 2012. "The Money Value of a Man," PIER Working Paper Archive 12-014, Penn Institute for Economic Research, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania.
    2. Thakuriah (Vonu), Piyushimita & Persky, Joseph & Soot, Siim & Sriraj, P.S., 2013. "Costs and benefits of employment transportation for low-wage workers: An assessment of job access public transportation services," Evaluation and Program Planning, Elsevier, vol. 37(C), pages 31-42.
    3. Brant Abbott & Giovanni Gallipoli, 2019. "Permanent-Income Inequality," Working Papers 2019-011, Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group.
    4. Michael S. Christian, 2014. "Human Capital Accounting in the United States: Context, Measurement, and Application," NBER Chapters, in: Measuring Economic Sustainability and Progress, pages 461-491, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Mark Huggett & Greg Kaplan, 2015. "How Large is the Stock Component of Human Capital?," NBER Working Papers 21238, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Michael S. Christian, 2011. "Human Capital Accounting in the United States: Context, Measurement, and Application," BEA Working Papers 0073, Bureau of Economic Analysis.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

Access and download statistics for all items

Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 1 paper announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-LAB: Labour Economics (1) 2009-05-23

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