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Psychosocial competencies and risky behaviours in Peru

Listed author(s):
  • Marta Favara

    ()

    (University of Oxford, Queen Elizabeth House)

  • Alan Sanchez

    ()

    (Grupo de Análisis para el Desarrollo)

Abstract We use a unique longitudinal dataset from Peru to investigate the relationship between psychosocial competencies related to the concepts of self-esteem, self-efficacy, and aspirations, and a number of risky behaviours at a crucial transition period between adolescence and early adulthood. First of all, we document a high prevalence of risky behaviours with 1 out of 2 individuals engaging in at least one risky activity by the age 19 with a dramatic increase between age 15 and 19. Second, we find a pronounced pro-male bias and some differences by area of residence particularly in drinking habits which are more prevalent in urban areas. Third, we find a negative correlation between early self-esteem and later risky behaviours which is robust to a number of specifications. Further, aspiring to higher education at the age of 15 is correlated to a lower probability of engaging in criminal behaviours at the age of 19. Similarly, aspirations protect girls from risky sexual behaviours. JEL classification: J24, J13, O15.

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File URL: http://link.springer.com/10.1186/s40175-016-0069-3
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Article provided by Springer & Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA) in its journal IZA Journal of Labor & Development.

Volume (Year): 6 (2017)
Issue (Month): 1 (December)
Pages: 1-40

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Handle: RePEc:spr:izaldv:v:6:y:2017:i:1:d:10.1186_s40175-016-0069-3
DOI: 10.1186/s40175-016-0069-3
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.springer.com

Web page: http://www.iza.org/en/webcontent/index_html?lang=en

Order Information: Web: http://www.springer.com/economics/journal/40175

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