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"It wasn't me, it as them!" A study of social influence in risky behaviour by adolescents

Author

Listed:
  • Andrew E. Clark

    (PJSE - Paris-Jourdan Sciences Economiques - ENS Paris - École normale supérieure - Paris - EHESS - École des hautes études en sciences sociales - ENPC - École des Ponts ParisTech - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, IZA - Institute for the Study of Labor - IZA, PSE - Paris School of Economics)

  • Youenn Lohéac

    (CES - Centre d'économie de la Sorbonne - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - UP1 - Université Panthéon-Sorbonne, Graduate School of Management of Brittany - Graduate School of Management of Brittany)

Abstract

Many years of concerted policy effort in Western countries has not prevented young people from experimenting with cigarettes, alcohol and marijuana. One potential explanation is that social interactions make consumption "sticky". We use detailed panel data from the Add Health survey to examine risky behavior (the consumption of tobacco, alcohol and marijuana) by American adolescents. We find that, even controlling for school fixed effects, these behaviors are correlated with lagged peer group behavior. Peer group effects are strongest for alcohol use, and young males are more influential than young females. Last, we present some evidence of non-linearities in social interactions.

Suggested Citation

  • Andrew E. Clark & Youenn Lohéac, 2007. ""It wasn't me, it as them!" A study of social influence in risky behaviour by adolescents," Université Paris1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Post-Print and Working Papers) halshs-00754219, HAL.
  • Handle: RePEc:hal:cesptp:halshs-00754219
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jhealeco.2006.11.005
    Note: View the original document on HAL open archive server: https://hal-pjse.archives-ouvertes.fr/halshs-00754219
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    Cited by:

    1. Maria Masood, 2015. "Local versus Foreign: A Microeconomic Analysis of Cultural Preferences," Research Papers by the Institute of Economics and Econometrics, Geneva School of Economics and Management, University of Geneva 15051, Institut d'Economie et Econométrie, Université de Genève.
    2. Robalino, Juan David, 2016. "Smoking Peer Effects among Adolescents: Are Popular Teens More Influential?," IZA Discussion Papers 9714, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. Lin, Xu, 2014. "Peer effects in adolescents' delinquent behaviors: Evidence from a binary choice network model," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 46(C), pages 73-92.
    4. Etilé, Fabrice & Jones, Andrew M., 2011. "Schooling and smoking among the baby boomers - An evaluation of the impact of educational expansion in France," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(4), pages 811-831, July.
    5. Marta Favara & Alan Sanchez, 2017. "Psychosocial competencies and risky behaviours in Peru," IZA Journal of Labor & Development, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 6(1), pages 1-40, December.
    6. Moriarty, John & McVicar, Duncan & Higgins, Kathryn, 2016. "Cross-section and panel estimates of peer effects in early adolescent cannabis use: With a little help from my ‘friends once removed’," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 163(C), pages 37-44.
    7. Elsner, Benjamin & Isphording, Ingo E., 2015. "Rank, Sex, Drugs, and Crime," IZA Discussion Papers 9478, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    8. Daniel Vaughan, 2013. "Nurture vs. Nurture: Endogenous Parental and Peer Effects and the Transmission of Culture," Working Papers 2013-04, Banco de México.
    9. repec:eee:regeco:v:67:y:2017:i:c:p:135-147 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. Choi, Jaesung & Park, Hyunjoon & Behrman, Jere R., 2015. "Separating boys and girls and increasing weight? Assessing the impacts of single-sex schools through random assignment in Seoul," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 134(C), pages 1-11.
    11. Liu, Xiaodong & Patacchini, Eleonora & Zenou, Yves, 2011. "Peer Effects in Education, Sport, and Screen Activities: Local Aggregate or Local Average?," CEPR Discussion Papers 8477, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.

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    Keywords

    Social interactions; Smoking; Drinking;

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