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Jinhu Li

Personal Details

First Name:Jinhu
Middle Name:
Last Name:Li
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pli659
http://www.jinhu-li.com/
Level 5, Faculty of Business and Economics Building 111 Barry Street The University of Melbourne Victoria 3010 Australia
+61 3 9035 3753

Affiliation

Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research (MIAESR)
Faculty of Business and Economics
University of Melbourne

Melbourne, Australia
http://www.melbourneinstitute.com/

: +61 3 8344 2100
+61 3 8344 2111
The University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010
RePEc:edi:mimelau (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Barbara Broadway & Guyonne Kalb & Jinhu Li & Anthony Scott, 2016. "Do Financial Incentives Influence GPs’ Decisions to Do After-Hours Work? A Discrete Choice Labour Supply Model," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2016n12, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
  2. Paul Contoyannis & Jinhu Li, 2014. "The Dynamics of Depression from Adolescence to Early Adulthood," Department of Economics Working Papers 2014-09, McMaster University.
  3. Paul Contoyannis & Jinhu Li, 2013. "Family Socio-Economic Status, Childhood Life-Events and the Dynamics of Depression from Adolescence to Early Adulthood," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2013n11, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
  4. Jeremiah Hurley & Phil DeCicca & Jinhu Li & Gioia Buckley, 2011. "The Response of Ontario Primary Care Physicians to Pay-for-Performance Incentives," Centre for Health Economics and Policy Analysis Working Paper Series 2011-02, Centre for Health Economics and Policy Analysis (CHEPA), McMaster University, Hamilton, Canada.
  5. Jinhu Li & Jeremiah Hurley & Philip DeCicca & Gioia Buckley, 2011. "Physician Response to Pay-for-Performance: Evidence from a Natural Experiment," NBER Working Papers 16909, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

Articles

  1. Paul Contoyannis & Jinhu Li, 2017. "The dynamics of adolescent depression: an instrumental variable quantile regression with fixed effects approach," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 180(3), pages 907-922, June.
  2. Li, Jinhu & Powdthavee, Nattavudh, 2015. "Does more education lead to better health habits? Evidence from the school reforms in Australia," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 127(C), pages 83-91.
  3. Li, Jinhu & Scott, Anthony & McGrail, Matthew & Humphreys, John & Witt, Julia, 2014. "Retaining rural doctors: Doctors' preferences for rural medical workforce incentives," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 121(C), pages 56-64.
  4. Jinhu Li & Jeremiah Hurley & Philip DeCicca & Gioia Buckley, 2014. "Physician Response To Pay‐For‐Performance: Evidence From A Natural Experiment," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 23(8), pages 962-978, August.
  5. Contoyannis, Paul & Li, Jinhu, 2011. "The evolution of health outcomes from childhood to adolescence," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(1), pages 11-32, January.
  6. Jinhu Li & Jeffrey S. Racine, 2008. "Maxima: An open source computer algebra system," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 23(4), pages 515-523.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Jeremiah Hurley & Phil DeCicca & Jinhu Li & Gioia Buckley, 2011. "The Response of Ontario Primary Care Physicians to Pay-for-Performance Incentives," Centre for Health Economics and Policy Analysis Working Paper Series 2011-02, Centre for Health Economics and Policy Analysis (CHEPA), McMaster University, Hamilton, Canada.

    Cited by:

    1. Marchildon, Gregory P. & Hutchison, Brian, 2016. "Primary care in Ontario, Canada: New proposals after 15 years of reform," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 120(7), pages 732-738.

  2. Jinhu Li & Jeremiah Hurley & Philip DeCicca & Gioia Buckley, 2011. "Physician Response to Pay-for-Performance: Evidence from a Natural Experiment," NBER Working Papers 16909, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    Cited by:

    1. Wübker, Ansgar, 2012. "Explaining Variations in Breast Cancer Screening Across European Countries," Ruhr Economic Papers 370, RWI - Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-University Bochum, TU Dortmund University, University of Duisburg-Essen.
    2. Jasmin Kantarevic & Boris Kralj, 2013. "Link Between Pay For Performance Incentives And Physician Payment Mechanisms: Evidence From The Diabetes Management Incentive In Ontario," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 22(12), pages 1417-1439, December.
    3. Panayotis Constantinou & Jonathan Sicsic & Carine Franc, 2017. "Effect of pay-for-performance on cervical cancer screening participation in France," International Journal of Health Economics and Management, Springer, vol. 17(2), pages 181-201, June.
    4. Anell, Anders & Dietrichson, Jens & Ellegård, Lina Maria, 2015. "Can Pay-for-Performance to Primary Care Providers Stimulate Appropriate Use of Antibiotics?," Working Papers 2015:36, Lund University, Department of Economics, revised 29 Jun 2016.
    5. Keser, Claudia & Peterle, Emmanuel & Schnitzler, Cornelius, 2014. "Money talks: Paying physicians for performance," Center for European, Governance and Economic Development Research Discussion Papers 173 [rev.], University of Goettingen, Department of Economics.
    6. Cox, James C. & Sadiraj, Vjollca & Schnier, Kurt E. & Sweeney, John F., 2016. "Incentivizing cost-effective reductions in hospital readmission rates," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 131(PB), pages 24-35.
    7. Kantarevic, Jasmin & Kralj, Boris, 2015. "Physician Payment Contracts in the Presence of Moral Hazard and Adverse Selection: The Theory and its Application to Ontario," IZA Discussion Papers 9142, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    8. Jonathan Sicsic & Carine Franc, 2017. "Impact assessment of a pay-for-performance program on breast cancer screening in France using micro data," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 18(5), pages 609-621, June.
    9. Strumpf, Erin & Ammi, Mehdi & Diop, Mamadou & Fiset-Laniel, Julie & Tousignant, Pierre, 2017. "The impact of team-based primary care on health care services utilization and costs: Quebec’s family medicine groups," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 55(C), pages 76-94.
    10. Logan McLeod & Jeffrey A. Johnson, 2015. "Changing the Schedule of Medical Benefits and the Effect on Primary Care Physician Billing: Quasi-Experimental Evidence from Alberta," Working Papers 150010, Canadian Centre for Health Economics.
    11. G. Fiorentini & M. Lippi Bruni & C. Ugolini, 2012. "GPs and hospital expenditures. Should we keep expenditure containment programs alive?," Working Papers wp829, Dipartimento Scienze Economiche, Universita' di Bologna.
    12. Raf Van Gestel, Tobias Mueller, Johan Bosmans, 2018. "Learning from failure in healthcare: Dynamic panel evidence of a physician shock effect," Diskussionsschriften dp1809, Universitaet Bern, Departement Volkswirtschaft.
    13. Lavergne, M. Ruth & Law, Michael R. & Peterson, Sandra & Garrison, Scott & Hurley, Jeremiah & Cheng, Lucy & McGrail, Kimberlyn, 2018. "Effect of incentive payments on chronic disease management and health services use in British Columbia, Canada: Interrupted time series analysis," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 122(2), pages 157-164.
    14. Dunn, Abe & Shapiro, Adam Hale, 2015. "Physician competition and the provision of care: evidence from heart attacks," Working Paper Series 2015-7, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco.
    15. Sarma, Sisira & Devlin, Rose Anne & Thind, Amardeep & Chu, Man-Kee, 2012. "Canadian family physicians’ decision to collaborate: Age, period and cohort effects," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 75(10), pages 1811-1819.
    16. Ammi, Mehdi & Fortier, Grant, 2017. "The influence of welfare systems on pay-for-performance programs for general practitioners: A critical review," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 178(C), pages 157-166.
    17. Sicsic, Jonathan & Le Vaillant, Marc & Franc, Carine, 2012. "Intrinsic and extrinsic motivations in primary care: An explanatory study among French general practitioners," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 108(2), pages 140-148.
    18. Nick Manning & Zahid Hasnain & Jan Henryk Pierskalla, 2012. "Public Sector Human Resource Practices to Drive Performance," World Bank Other Operational Studies 25489, The World Bank.
    19. Kantarevic, Jasmin & Kralj, Boris & Weinkauf, Darrel, 2011. "Enhanced fee-for-service model and physician productivity: Evidence from Family Health Groups in Ontario," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(1), pages 99-111, January.
    20. Mehdi Ammi & Christine Peyron, 2016. "Heterogeneity in general practitioners’ preferences for quality improvement programs: a choice experiment and policy simulation in France," Health Economics Review, Springer, vol. 6(1), pages 1-11, December.
    21. Van Gestel, R.; Müller, T.; Bosmans, J.;, 2017. "Learning from failure in healthcare: dynamic panel evidence of a physician shock effect," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 17/24, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
    22. Sicsic, Jonathan & Krucien, Nicolas & Franc, Carine, 2016. "What are GPs' preferences for financial and non-financial incentives in cancer screening? Evidence for breast, cervical, and colorectal cancers," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 167(C), pages 116-127.

Articles

  1. Li, Jinhu & Powdthavee, Nattavudh, 2015. "Does more education lead to better health habits? Evidence from the school reforms in Australia," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 127(C), pages 83-91.

    Cited by:

    1. Dang, Thang, 2017. "Does the More Educated Utilize More Health Care Services? Evidence from Vietnam Using a Regression Discontinuity Design," MPRA Paper 77641, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Setti Rais Ali & Paul Dourgnon & Lise Rochaix, 2018. "Social Capital or Education: What Matters Most to Cut Time to Diagnosis?," PSE Working Papers halshs-01703170, HAL.
    3. Sarah Dahmann & Silke Anger, 2014. "The Impact of Education on Personality: Evidence from a German High School Reform," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 658, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    4. Janke, Katharina & Johnston, David W. & Propper, Carol & Shields, Michael A., 2018. "The Causal Effect of Education on Chronic Health Conditions," IZA Discussion Papers 11353, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    5. Barr, Peter B. & Salvatore, Jessica E. & Maes, Hermine & Aliev, Fazil & Latvala, Antti & Viken, Richard & Rose, Richard J. & Kaprio, Jaakko & Dick, Danielle M., 2016. "Education and alcohol use: A study of gene-environment interaction in young adulthood," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 162(C), pages 158-167.
    6. Kassenboehmer, Sonja C. & Schurer, Stefanie & Leung, Felix, 2015. "Testing the Validity of Item Non-Response as a Proxy for Cognitive and Non-Cognitive Skills," IZA Discussion Papers 8874, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    7. Titus J. Galama & Adriana Lleras-Muney & Hans van Kippersluis, 2018. "The Effect of Education on Health and Mortality: A Review of Experimental and Quasi-Experimental Evidence," NBER Working Papers 24225, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

  2. Li, Jinhu & Scott, Anthony & McGrail, Matthew & Humphreys, John & Witt, Julia, 2014. "Retaining rural doctors: Doctors' preferences for rural medical workforce incentives," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 121(C), pages 56-64.

    Cited by:

    1. Pedro Ramos & Hélio Alves & Paulo Guimarães & Maria A. Ferreira, 2017. "Junior doctors’ medical specialty and practice location choice: simulating policies to overcome regional inequalities," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 18(8), pages 1013-1030, November.

  3. Jinhu Li & Jeremiah Hurley & Philip DeCicca & Gioia Buckley, 2014. "Physician Response To Pay‐For‐Performance: Evidence From A Natural Experiment," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 23(8), pages 962-978, August.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  4. Contoyannis, Paul & Li, Jinhu, 2011. "The evolution of health outcomes from childhood to adolescence," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(1), pages 11-32, January.

    Cited by:

    1. Sarah Cattan & Daniel A. Kamhöfer & Martin Karlsson & Therese Nilsson, 2017. "The short- and long-term effects of student absence: evidence from Sweden," IFS Working Papers W17/21, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
    2. Ohrnberger, Julius & Fichera, Eleonora & Sutton, Matt, 2017. "The dynamics of physical and mental health in the older population," The Journal of the Economics of Ageing, Elsevier, vol. 9(C), pages 52-62.
    3. Khanam, Rasheda & Nghiem, Son & Connelly, Luke, 2016. "The effects of parental leave on child health and postnatal care: Evidence from Australia," Economic Analysis and Policy, Elsevier, vol. 49(C), pages 17-29.
    4. Cubi-Molla, P. & Jofre-Bonet, M. & Serra-Sastre, V., 2013. "Adaptation to Health States: A Micro-Econometric Approach," Working Papers 13/02, Department of Economics, City University London.
    5. Alexander N. Slade & Andrea H. Beller & Elizabeth T. Powers, 2017. "Family structure and young adult health outcomes," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 15(1), pages 175-197, March.
    6. Cattan, Sarah & Kamhöfer, Daniel A. & Karlsson, Martin & Nilsson, Therese, 2017. "The Short- and Long-Term Effects of Student Absence: Evidence from Sweden," IZA Discussion Papers 10995, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    7. Paul Contoyannis & Jinhu Li, 2017. "The dynamics of adolescent depression: an instrumental variable quantile regression with fixed effects approach," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 180(3), pages 907-922, June.
    8. Ohrnberger, Julius & Fichera, Eleonora & Sutton, Matt, 2017. "The relationship between physical and mental health: A mediation analysis," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 195(C), pages 42-49.
    9. Rasheda Khanam & Son Nghiem, 2016. "Family Income and Child Cognitive and Noncognitive Development in Australia: Does Money Matter?," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 53(3), pages 597-621, June.
    10. Cattan, Sarah & Kamhofer, Daniel A. & Karlsson, Martin & Nilsson, Therese, 2017. "The Short- and Long-term Effects of Student Absence: Evidence from Sweden," Working Paper Series 1188, Research Institute of Industrial Economics.

  5. Jinhu Li & Jeffrey S. Racine, 2008. "Maxima: An open source computer algebra system," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 23(4), pages 515-523.

    Cited by:

    1. Tomasz Kopczewski, 2015. "Think not calculate! Implementation of Felix Klein postulates in economic education with CAS software," Working Papers 2015-38, Faculty of Economic Sciences, University of Warsaw.
    2. Halkos, George & Tsilika, Kyriaki, 2016. "Measures of correlation and computer algebra," MPRA Paper 70200, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Kabeel, A.E. & El-Said, Emad M.S. & Dafea, S.A., 2015. "A review of magnetic field effects on flow and heat transfer in liquids: Present status and future potential for studies and applications," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 830-837.
    4. George E. Halkos & Kyriaki D. Tsilika, 2018. "Programming Correlation Criteria with free CAS Software," Computational Economics, Springer;Society for Computational Economics, vol. 52(1), pages 299-311, June.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 6 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-HEA: Health Economics (4) 2011-04-09 2012-05-02 2013-04-06 2014-09-25
  2. NEP-DCM: Discrete Choice Models (2) 2016-03-29 2016-05-14
  3. NEP-LMA: Labor Markets - Supply, Demand, & Wages (2) 2016-03-29 2016-05-14
  4. NEP-UPT: Utility Models & Prospect Theory (2) 2016-03-29 2016-05-14
  5. NEP-DEM: Demographic Economics (1) 2013-04-06
  6. NEP-HRM: Human Capital & Human Resource Management (1) 2012-05-02

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