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Quality and quantity in primary care mixed-payment models: evidence from family health organizations in Ontario

  • Boris Kralj
  • Jasmin Kantarevic

We study the impact of a mixed capitation model (the Family Health Organization, FHO) on quality and quantity outcomes among primary care physicians in Ontario. Using a panel of administrative data covering one year before and two years after the FHO model was introduced, we find that physicians in the FHO model provide about 6% to 7% fewer services and visits per day, but are between 7% and 11% more likely to achieve preventive care quality targets. These results suggest that the mixed capitation model with contractible quality indicators may be welfare improving relative to the FFS model.

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Article provided by Canadian Economics Association in its journal Canadian Journal of Economics.

Volume (Year): 46 (2013)
Issue (Month): 1 (February)
Pages: 208-238

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Handle: RePEc:cje:issued:v:46:y:2013:i:1:p:208-238
Contact details of provider: Postal: Canadian Economics Association Prof. Steven Ambler, Secretary-Treasurer c/o Olivier Lebert, CEA/CJE/CPP Office C.P. 35006, 1221 Fleury Est Montréal, Québec, Canada H2C 3K4
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  6. Åke Blomqvist & Pierre Thomas Léger, 2003. "Information Asymmetry, Insurance, and the Decision to Hospitalize," Departmental Working Papers wp0305, National University of Singapore, Department of Economics.
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  9. Kantarevic, Jasmin & Kralj, Boris & Weinkauf, Darrel, 2011. "Enhanced fee-for-service model and physician productivity: Evidence from Family Health Groups in Ontario," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(1), pages 99-111, January.
  10. Eggleston, Karen, 2005. "Multitasking and mixed systems for provider payment," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 24(1), pages 211-223, January.
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