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Physician Financial Incentives and Cesarean Section Delivery

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Listed:
  • Jonathan Gruber
  • Maria Owings

Abstract

The "induced-demand" model states that in the face of negative income shocks, physicians may exploit their agency relationship with patients by providing excessive care. We test this model using an exogenous change in the financial environment facing obstetrician/

Suggested Citation

  • Jonathan Gruber & Maria Owings, 1996. "Physician Financial Incentives and Cesarean Section Delivery," RAND Journal of Economics, The RAND Corporation, vol. 27(1), pages 99-123, Spring.
  • Handle: RePEc:rje:randje:v:27:y:1996:i:spring:p:99-123
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Thomas G. McGuire & Mark V. Pauly, 1991. "Physician Response to Fee Changes with Multiple Payers," Papers 0015, Boston University - Industry Studies Programme.
    2. J Hurley & R Labelle & T Rice, 1990. "The Relationship Between Physician Fees and the Utilization of Medical Services in Ontario," Centre for Health Economics and Policy Analysis Working Paper Series 1990-04, Centre for Health Economics and Policy Analysis (CHEPA), McMaster University, Hamilton, Canada.
    3. David Bloom & James Trussell, 1984. "What are the determinants of delayed childbearing and permanent childlessness in the United States?," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 21(4), pages 591-611, November.
    4. Cromwell, Jerry & Mitchell, Janet B., 1986. "Physician-induced demand for surgery," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 5(4), pages 293-313, December.
    5. repec:aph:ajpbhl:10.2105/ajph.69.9.864_2 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Grytten, Jostein & Holst, Dorthe & Laake, Peter, 1990. "Supplier inducement : Its effect on dental services in Norway," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 9(4), pages 483-491, December.
    7. Jonathan Gruber, 1992. "The Efficiency of a Group-Specific Mandated Benefit: Evidence From Health Insurance Benefits for Maternity," NBER Working Papers 4157, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Goddeeris, John H, 1984. "Medical Insurance, Technological Change, and Welfare," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 22(1), pages 56-67, January.
    9. T Rice & R Labelle, 1989. "Do Physicians Induce Demand for Medical Service?," Centre for Health Economics and Policy Analysis Working Paper Series 18, Centre for Health Economics and Policy Analysis (CHEPA), McMaster University, Hamilton, Canada.
    10. McGuire, Thomas G. & Pauly, Mark V., 1991. "Physician response to fee changes with multiple payers," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 10(4), pages 385-410.
    11. Victor R. Fuchs, 1978. "The Supply of Surgeons and the Demand for Operations," NBER Working Papers 0236, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • I11 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Analysis of Health Care Markets

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