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National Health Care And Quality Of Service: Lessons From Medicaid

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  • W. DAVID Bradford

Abstract

Much recent public debate centers around failures in the U.S. health care system. Studies indicate that as many as 33 million Americans are without health insurance, while health care expenditures continue to out‐strip GNP growth. Numerous proposals for national health insurance have surfaced in response to these apparent shortcomings. The various proposed health insurance structures are not always based upon careful economic evaluation of incentive schemes and of the full range of potential effects. This paper examines results of recent Medicaid system studies so as to shed light upon the outcomes one can expect from national health insurance plans possessing similar incentive structures. The results here have potentially useful policy implications.

Suggested Citation

  • W. DAVID Bradford, 1993. "National Health Care And Quality Of Service: Lessons From Medicaid," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 11(2), pages 23-38, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:coecpo:v:11:y:1993:i:2:p:23-38
    DOI: 10.1111/j.1465-7287.1993.tb00377.x
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