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Medical Insurance, Technological Change, and Welfare

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  • Goddeeris, John H

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  • Goddeeris, John H, 1984. "Medical Insurance, Technological Change, and Welfare," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 22(1), pages 56-67, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:ecinqu:v:22:y:1984:i:1:p:56-67
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    Cited by:

    1. Lakdawalla, Darius & Malani, Anup & Reif, Julian, 2017. "The insurance value of medical innovation," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 145(C), pages 94-102.
    2. Mark V. Pauly, 2002. "Can Insurance Cause Medical Care Spending to Grow too Rapidly?," Vierteljahrshefte zur Wirtschaftsforschung / Quarterly Journal of Economic Research, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research, vol. 71(4), pages 468-476.
    3. Pedro Pita Barros & Xavier Martínez-Giralt, 2009. "Technological adoption in health care," Working Papers 413, Barcelona Graduate School of Economics.
    4. Robert F. Graboyes, 2000. "Getting better, feeling worse : cure rates, health insurance, and welfare," Working Paper 00-05, Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond.
    5. Ellis, Randall P. & Jiang, Shenyi & Manning, Willard G., 2015. "Optimal health insurance for multiple goods and time periods," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(C), pages 89-106.
    6. Jonathan Gruber & Maria Owings, 1996. "Physician Financial Incentives and Cesarean Section Delivery," RAND Journal of Economics, The RAND Corporation, vol. 27(1), pages 99-123, Spring.
    7. Maria del Carmen García-Alonso & Owen O'Donnell, 2001. "Income Redistribution and Access to Innovations in Health Care," Studies in Economics 0111, School of Economics, University of Kent.
    8. Ralph Bradley, 1994. "Growth Of U.S. Health Care Spending," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 12(4), pages 45-56, October.
    9. Aaron Schwartz & Roger Magoulas & Melinda Buntin, 2013. "Tracking Labor Demand with Online Job Postings: The Case of Health IT Workers and the HITECH Act," Industrial Relations: A Journal of Economy and Society, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 52(4), pages 941-968, October.
    10. Robert F. Graboyes, 2000. "Our money or your life : indemnities vs. deductibles in health insurance," Working Paper 00-04, Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond.
    11. Joseph P. Newhouse, 1992. "Medical Care Costs: How Much Welfare Loss?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 6(3), pages 3-21, Summer.
    12. Marisa Miraldo, 2007. "Hospital Financing and the Development and Adoption of New Technologies," Working Papers 026cherp, Centre for Health Economics, University of York.
    13. Finocchiaro Castro, Massimo & Guccio, Calogero & Pignataro, Giacomo & Rizzo, Ilde, 2014. "The effects of reimbursement mechanisms on medical technology diffusion in the hospital sector in the Italian NHS," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 115(2), pages 215-229.
    14. Selder, Astrid, 2005. "Physician reimbursement and technology adoption," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 24(5), pages 907-930, September.
    15. Robert F. Graboyes, 2000. "Medicine worse than the malady : cure rates, population shifts, and health insurance," Working Paper 00-06, Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond.

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