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Does the More Educated Utilize More Health Care Services? Evidence from Vietnam Using a Regression Discontinuity Design

Author

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  • Dang, Thang

Abstract

In 1991 Vietnam implemented a compulsory schooling reform that provides this paper a natural experiment to estimate the causal effect of education on health care utilization measured by the probability of doctor visit, the frequency of doctor visit and per visit out-of-pocket expenditure with a regression discontinuity design. The paper finds that schooling induces considerable impacts on health care utilization although the signs of the impacts changes with specific types of health care service examined. In particular, increased education aggrandizes inpatient utilization whereas it reduces outpatient health care utilization for both public and private health sectors. The estimates are strongly robust to various windows of the sample choice. The paper also discovers that the links between education and health insurance or income play very essential roles as potential mechanisms to explain the causal impacts of education on health care utilization in Vietnam.

Suggested Citation

  • Dang, Thang, 2017. "Does the More Educated Utilize More Health Care Services? Evidence from Vietnam Using a Regression Discontinuity Design," MPRA Paper 77641, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:77641
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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/77641/1/MPRA_paper_77641.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. David S. Lee & Thomas Lemieux, 2010. "Regression Discontinuity Designs in Economics," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 48(2), pages 281-355, June.
    2. Hoai, Nguyen Trong & Dang, Thang, 2016. "The Determinants of self-medication: evidence from urban Vietnam," MPRA Paper 75358, University Library of Munich, Germany.
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    4. Lonnroth, Knut & Thuong, Le Minh & Linh, Pham Duy & Diwan, Vinod, 1998. "Risks and benefits of private health care: exploring physicians' views on private health care in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 45(2), pages 81-97, August.
    5. repec:taf:edecon:v:27:y:2019:i:2:p:207-221 is not listed on IDEAS
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    Cited by:

    1. Dang, Thang, 2017. "The Multiple Effects of Child Health Insurance in Vietnam," MPRA Paper 78614, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Dang, Thang, 2017. "Education as Protection? The Effect of Schooling on Non-Wage Compensation in a Developing Country," MPRA Paper 79223, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Education; health care utilization; regression discontinuity design; Vietnam;

    JEL classification:

    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior
    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth

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