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The causal effect of education on health: Evidence from the United Kingdom

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  • Silles, Mary A.

Abstract

Numerous economic studies have shown a strong positive correlation between health and years of schooling. The question at the centre of this research is whether the correlation between health and education represents a causal relation. This paper uses changes in compulsory schooling laws in the United Kingdom to test this hypothesis. Multiple measures of overall health are used. The results provide evidence of a causal relation running from more schooling to better health which is much larger than standard regression estimates suggest.

Suggested Citation

  • Silles, Mary A., 2009. "The causal effect of education on health: Evidence from the United Kingdom," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 28(1), pages 122-128, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecoedu:v:28:y:2009:i:1:p:122-128
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Keywords

    Education Health Endogeneity bias;

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