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Understanding the Mechanisms Linking College Education with Longevity

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Listed:
  • Hong, Kai

    (New York University)

  • Savelyev, Peter A.

    () (College of William and Mary)

  • Tan, Kegon T.K.

    () (University of Rochester)

Abstract

We go beyond estimating the effect of college attainment on longevity by uncovering the mechanisms behind this effect while controlling for latent skills and unobserved heterogeneity. We decompose the effect with respect to a large set of potential mechanisms, including health behaviors, lifestyles, earnings, work conditions, and health at the start of the risk period (1993–2017). Our estimates are based on theWisconsin Longitudinal Study and show that the effect of education on longevity is well explained by observed mechanisms. Furthermore, we find that for women, the positive effect of education on longevity has been historically masked by the negative effect of education on marriage. An adjustment for the relationship between education and marriage based on data for more recent cohorts increases the explained effect of education on longevity for women. We discuss the implications for policies aimed at improving health and longevity and reducing health inequality.

Suggested Citation

  • Hong, Kai & Savelyev, Peter A. & Tan, Kegon T.K., 2020. "Understanding the Mechanisms Linking College Education with Longevity," IZA Discussion Papers 13118, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp13118
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    Cited by:

    1. Peter Savelyev & Benjamin Ward & Bob Krueger & Matthew McGue, 2020. "Health Endowments, Schooling Allocation in the Family, and Longevity: Evidence from US Twins," Working Papers 2020-040, Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    health behaviors; mechanisms; longevity; college education; lifestyles;

    JEL classification:

    • C41 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods: Special Topics - - - Duration Analysis; Optimal Timing Strategies
    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity

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