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Socioemotional Skills, Education, and Health-Related Outcomes of High-Ability Individuals

Listed author(s):
  • Peter Savelyev

    ()

    (Vanderbilt University)

  • Kegon Tan

    ()

    (University of Wisconsin-Medison)

We estimate the effects of education and five well-established socioemotional skills on essential life outcomes including health behaviors, health-related lifestyles, earnings, as well as general and mental health. We supplement results in papers that treat socioemotional skills as a single-dimensional variable and find important heterogeneity that a one-dimensional representation does not capture. By combining factor-analytic modeling with a powerful procedure to account for multiple-hypothesis testing, we control for the ability bias, for the measurement error in proxies of socioemotional skills, and for the family-wise error rate. We also contribute to the still controversial discussion about the causal effect of education on health-related outcomes by using alternative methods to the use of natural experiments. We use the Terman data, a unique longitudinal study.

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File URL: http://www.accessecon.com/pubs/VUECON/VUECON-15-00007.pdf
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Paper provided by Vanderbilt University Department of Economics in its series Vanderbilt University Department of Economics Working Papers with number 15-00007.

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Date of creation: 29 May 2015
Handle: RePEc:van:wpaper:vuecon-15-00007
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.vanderbilt.edu/econ/wparchive/index.html

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