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Taxes, cigarette consumption, and smoking intensity: reply

Author

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  • Adda, Jérôme
  • Cornaglia, Francesca

Abstract

This paper shows that smoking intensity, i.e. the amount of nicotine extracted per cigarette smoked, responds to changes in excise taxes and tobacco prices. We exploit data covering the period 1988 to 2006 across many US states. Moreover, we provide new evidence on the importance of cotinine measures in explaining long-run smoking behaviour and we investigate the sensitivity of smoking cessation to changes in excise taxes and their interaction with smoking intensity.

Suggested Citation

  • Adda, Jérôme & Cornaglia, Francesca, 2012. "Taxes, cigarette consumption, and smoking intensity: reply," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 51514, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  • Handle: RePEc:ehl:lserod:51514
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    File URL: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/51514/
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. J?r?me Adda & Francesca Cornaglia, 2013. "Taxes, Cigarette Consumption, and Smoking Intensity: Reply," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 103(7), pages 3102-3114, December.
    2. A. Colin Cameron & Jonah B. Gelbach & Douglas L. Miller, 2008. "Bootstrap-Based Improvements for Inference with Clustered Errors," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 90(3), pages 414-427, August.
    3. Jérôme Adda & Francesca Cornaglia, 2010. "The Effect of Bans and Taxes on Passive Smoking," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 2(1), pages 1-32, January.
    4. Jason Abrevaya & Laura Puzzello, 2012. "Taxes, Cigarette Consumption, and Smoking Intensity: Comment," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 102(4), pages 1751-1763, June.
    5. Marianne Bertrand & Esther Duflo & Sendhil Mullainathan, 2004. "How Much Should We Trust Differences-In-Differences Estimates?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 119(1), pages 249-275.
    6. Jérôme Adda & Francesca Cornaglia, 2006. "Taxes, Cigarette Consumption, and Smoking Intensity," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 96(4), pages 1013-1028, September.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Irvine Ian J. & Nguyen Van Hai, 2014. "Retail Tobacco Display Bans," Forum for Health Economics & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 17(2), pages 1-27, September.
    2. Kyle Rozema & Nicolas Ziebarth, 2015. "Behavioral Responses to Taxation: Cigarette Taxes and Food Stamp Take-Up," Working Papers 150015, Canadian Centre for Health Economics.
    3. Odermatt, Reto & Stutzer, Alois, 2015. "Smoking bans, cigarette prices and life satisfaction," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 176-194.
    4. J?r?me Adda & Francesca Cornaglia, 2013. "Taxes, Cigarette Consumption, and Smoking Intensity: Reply," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 103(7), pages 3102-3114, December.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • D12 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Consumer Economics: Empirical Analysis
    • H25 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Business Taxes and Subsidies
    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior

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