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Do smoke-free car laws work? Evidence from a quasi-experiment

  • Nguyen, Hai V.
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    In response to increased risks of second-hand smoke exposure for children travelling in cars and its resulting deleterious health impacts, several jurisdictions passed legislation that bans smoking in private vehicles when children are present. In this study, I exploit a unique quasi-experiment from Canada and employ the difference-in-differences and triple-differences techniques to empirically evaluate this legislation. I find that the legislation reduces exposure to second-hand smoke inside cars for children. Further, there appears no marked increase in smoking at home after the implementation of the legislation.

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    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Health Economics.

    Volume (Year): 32 (2013)
    Issue (Month): 1 ()
    Pages: 138-148

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:jhecon:v:32:y:2013:i:1:p:138-148
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