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The effects of soft drink taxes on child and adolescent consumption and weight outcomes

  • Fletcher, Jason M.
  • Frisvold, David E.
  • Tefft, Nathan

Childhood and adolescent obesity is associated with serious adverse lifetime health consequences and its prevalence has increased rapidly. Soft drink consumption has also expanded rapidly, so much so that soft drinks are currently the largest single contributors to energy intake. In this paper, we investigate the potential for soft drink taxes to combat rising levels of child and adolescent obesity through a reduction in consumption. Our results, based on state soft drink sales and excise tax information between 1989 and 2006 and the National Health Examination and Nutrition Survey, suggest that soft drink taxation, as currently practiced in the United States, leads to a moderate reduction in soft drink consumption by children and adolescents. However, we show that this reduction in soda consumption is completely offset by increases in consumption of other high-calorie drinks.

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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Public Economics.

Volume (Year): 94 (2010)
Issue (Month): 11-12 (December)
Pages: 967-974

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Handle: RePEc:eee:pubeco:v:94:y:2010:i:11-12:p:967-974
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/505578

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