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The Determinants of self-medication: evidence from urban Vietnam

Author

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  • Hoai, Nguyen Trong
  • Dang, Thang

Abstract

This study examines the primary determinants of self-medications among urban citizens in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. To achieve the research objective, the questionnaire is designed to elicit the respondents’ necessary information using in-depth personal interviews. Employing logistic models the paper finds that the probability of self-medication is positively associated with the respondents’ high school degree or vocational certificate, married status, and income while it is negatively related to employed status, the number of children, the geographical distance from home to the nearest hospital, doing exercise, and living in a central region. Meanwhile, using Poisson models the paper finds that the frequency of self-medication is positively associated with the respondents’ high school and vocational, married, income, and chronic disease while the frequency of self-medication is adversely related to male, employed, children number, distance, being close to health professional and central areas.

Suggested Citation

  • Hoai, Nguyen Trong & Dang, Thang, 2016. "The Determinants of self-medication: evidence from urban Vietnam," MPRA Paper 75358, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:75358
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Fwu‐Ranq Chang & Pravin K. Trivedi, 2003. "Economics of self‐medication: theory and evidence," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 12(9), pages 721-739, September.
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    Cited by:

    1. Dang, Thang, 2017. "Does the More Educated Utilize More Health Care Services? Evidence from Vietnam Using a Regression Discontinuity Design," MPRA Paper 77641, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Thang Dang, 2018. "Do the more educated utilize more health care services? Evidence from Vietnam using a regression discontinuity design," International Journal of Health Economics and Management, Springer, vol. 18(3), pages 277-299, September.
    3. Dang, Thang, 2017. "The Multiple Effects of Child Health Insurance in Vietnam," MPRA Paper 78614, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Self-medication; Ho Chi Minh City; Vietnam;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • I11 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Analysis of Health Care Markets
    • I18 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Government Policy; Regulation; Public Health

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