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Workforce reduction, subjective job insecurity, and mental health

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  • Reichert, Arndt R.
  • Tauchmann, Harald

Abstract

We examine the link between workforce reduction, subjective job insecurity, and mental health using individual level panel data for private-sector employees in Germany. We first estimate the effect of firm-level workforce reductions on mental health, finding a strong, negative, and statistically significant relationship. We then extensively examine the role of subjective job insecurity as mediating variable and its importance relative to other possible channels for the effect of workforce reduction on mental health. Eventually, as an extension to our analysis, we use life satisfaction as alternative outcome variable.

Suggested Citation

  • Reichert, Arndt R. & Tauchmann, Harald, 2017. "Workforce reduction, subjective job insecurity, and mental health," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 133(C), pages 187-212.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jeborg:v:133:y:2017:i:c:p:187-212 DOI: 10.1016/j.jebo.2016.10.018
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Johnston, David W. & Shields, Michael A. & Suziedelyte, Agne, 2017. "World Commodity Prices, Job Security and Health: Evidence from the Mining Industry," IZA Discussion Papers 11251, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Mental health; Life satisfaction; Job insecurity; Workforce reduction; Fear of job loss; Labor market dynamics;

    JEL classification:

    • I10 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - General
    • I18 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Government Policy; Regulation; Public Health
    • J28 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Safety; Job Satisfaction; Related Public Policy
    • J65 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Unemployment Insurance; Severance Pay; Plant Closings

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