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Effects of pay-for-performance on prescription of hypertension drugs among public and private primary care providers in Sweden

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  • Lina Maria Ellegård

    (Lund University)

Abstract

This study exploits policy reforms in Swedish primary care to examine the effect of pay-for-performance (P4P) on compliance with hypertension drug guidelines among public and private health care providers. Using provider-level outcome data for 2005–2013 from the Swedish Prescription Register, providers in regions using P4P were compared to providers in other regions in a difference-in-differences analysis. The results indicate that P4P improved guideline compliance regarding prescription of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers. The effect was mainly driven by private providers, suggesting that policy makers should take ownership into account when designing incentives for health care providers.

Suggested Citation

  • Lina Maria Ellegård, 2020. "Effects of pay-for-performance on prescription of hypertension drugs among public and private primary care providers in Sweden," International Journal of Health Economics and Management, Springer, vol. 20(3), pages 215-228, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:ijhcfe:v:20:y:2020:i:3:d:10.1007_s10754-020-09278-y
    DOI: 10.1007/s10754-020-09278-y
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    Blog mentions

    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. Chris Sampson’s journal round-up for 7th September 2020
      by Chris Sampson in The Academic Health Economists' Blog on 2020-09-07 11:00:07

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Pay-for-performance; Hypertension treatment; Ownership; Primary health care;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • D23 - Microeconomics - - Production and Organizations - - - Organizational Behavior; Transaction Costs; Property Rights
    • I11 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Analysis of Health Care Markets
    • I18 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Government Policy; Regulation; Public Health
    • J33 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Compensation Packages; Payment Methods
    • H73 - Public Economics - - State and Local Government; Intergovernmental Relations - - - Interjurisdictional Differentials and Their Effects

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