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Pay-for-Performance Incentives in Low- and Middle-Income Country Health Programs

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  • Grant Miller
  • Kimberly Singer Babiarz

Abstract

This chapter surveys experience with performance pay in developing country health programs. In doing so, it focuses on four key conceptual issues: (1) What to reward, (2) Who to reward, (3) How to reward, and (4) What unintended consequences might performance incentives create. We highlight that the use of performance pay has outpaced growth in corresponding empirical evidence. Moreover, very little research on performance incentives focuses on the underlying conceptual issues that we outline. We consider these to be important constraints to the design of better performance incentives in low- and middle-income country health programs.

Suggested Citation

  • Grant Miller & Kimberly Singer Babiarz, 2013. "Pay-for-Performance Incentives in Low- and Middle-Income Country Health Programs," NBER Working Papers 18932, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:18932
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    Cited by:

    1. Bonfrer, Igna & Van de Poel, Ellen & Van Doorslaer, Eddy, 2014. "The effects of performance incentives on the utilization and quality of maternal and child care in Burundi," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 123(C), pages 96-104.
    2. Singh, Prakarsh & Mitra, Sandip, 2017. "Incentives, information and malnutrition: Evidence from an experiment in India," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 93(C), pages 24-46.
    3. Alpízar, Francisco & Nordén, Anna & Pfaff, Alexander & Robalino, Juan, 2017. "Spillovers from targeting of incentives: Exploring responses to being excluded," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 59(C), pages 87-98.
    4. Elise Huillery & Juliette Seban, 2015. "Financial Incentives are Counterproductive in Non-Profit Sectors: Evidence from a Health Experiment," Working Papers hal-01164460, HAL.
    5. Elise Huillery & Juliette Seban, 2014. "Performance-Based Financing, Motivation and Final Output in the Health Sector: Experimental Evidence from the Democratic Republic of Congo," Sciences Po Economics Discussion Papers 2014-12, Sciences Po Departement of Economics.
    6. repec:eee:socmed:v:181:y:2017:i:c:p:54-65 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Singh, Prakarsh & Mitra, Sandip, 2016. "Performance Pay and Malnutrition," IZA Discussion Papers 10084, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    8. Collins Chansa & Ashis Das & Jumana Qamruddin & Jed Friedman & Akafwilangachi Mkandawire & Monique Vledder, 2015. "Linking Results to Performance: Evidence from a Results Based Financing Pre-Pilot Project in Katete District, Zambia," Health, Nutrition and Population (HNP) Discussion Paper Series 98265, The World Bank.
    9. Jacky MATHONNAT & Aurore PELISSIER, 2017. "How a Results-Based Financing approach can contribute to the health Sustainable Development Goals - Policy-oriented lessons: what we know, what we need to know and don’t yet know," Working Papers P204, FERDI.
    10. Jacky MATHONNAT & Aurore PELISSIER, 2017. "How a Results-Based Financing approach can contribute to the health Sustainable Development Goals - Policy-oriented lessons: what we know, what we need to know and don’t yet know," Working Papers P204, FERDI.
    11. Carmen Carpio & Natalia Santiago Bench, 2015. "The Health Workforce in Latin America and the Caribbean," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 22027.
    12. Prakarsh Singh & Sandip Mitra, 2015. "Performance Pay and Malnutrition: Evidence from an Experiment targeting Child Malnutrition in West Bengal," NCID Working Papers 05/2015, Navarra Center for International Development, University of Navarra.
    13. Renfu Luo & Grant Miller & Scott Rozelle & Sean Sylvia & Marcos Vera-Hernández, 2015. "Can Bureaucrats Really Be Paid Like CEOs? School Administrator Incentives for Anemia Reduction in Rural China," NBER Working Papers 21302, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    14. Victoria Menil, 2015. "Missed Opportunities in Global Health: Identifying New Strategies to Improve Mental Health in LMICs," Working Papers id:7987, eSocialSciences.
    15. Singh, Prakarsh & Masters, William A., 2016. "Behavior Change for Early Childhood Nutrition: Effectiveness of Health Worker Training Depends on Maternal Information in a Randomized Control Trial," IZA Discussion Papers 10375, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    16. Brockmeyer, Anne & Khatrouch, Maha & Raballand, Gael, 2015. "Public sector size and performance management : a case-study of post-revolution Tunisia," Policy Research Working Paper Series 7159, The World Bank.
    17. Singh, Prakarsh, 2015. "Performance pay and information: Reducing child undernutrition in India," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 112(C), pages 141-163.
    18. Elise Huillery & Juliette Seban, 2014. "Performance-Based Financing, Motivation and Final Output in the Health Sector: Experimental Evidence from the Democratic Republic of Congo," Working Papers hal-01071880, HAL.
    19. Catalina Tejada & Eliana Ferrara & Henrik Kleven & Florian Blum & Oriana Bandiera & Michel Azulai, 2015. "State Effectiveness, Growth, and Development," Working Papers id:6668, eSocialSciences.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • H51 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Government Expenditures and Health
    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior
    • O12 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Microeconomic Analyses of Economic Development
    • O17 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Formal and Informal Sectors; Shadow Economy; Institutional Arrangements
    • Z18 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics - - - Public Policy

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