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Motivating Knowledge Agents: Can Incentive Pay Overcome Social Distance

Author

Listed:
  • Berg, Erland

    (University of Oxford)

  • Ghatak, Maitreesh

    (London School of Economics)

  • Manjula, R

    (ISEC)

  • Rajasekhar, D

    (ISEC)

  • Roy, Sanchari

    (University of Warwick)

Abstract

This paper studies the interaction of incentive pay and social distance in the dissemination of information.We analyse theoretically as well as empirically the effect of incentive pay when agents have pro-social objectives,but also preferences over dealing with one social group relative to another. In a randomised field experiment under taken across 151 villages in South India,local agents were hired to spread information about a public health insurance programme.Relative to flat pay,incentive pay improves knowledge transmission to households that are socially distant from the agent,but not to households similar to the agent.

Suggested Citation

  • Berg, Erland & Ghatak, Maitreesh & Manjula, R & Rajasekhar, D & Roy, Sanchari, 2013. "Motivating Knowledge Agents: Can Incentive Pay Overcome Social Distance," CAGE Online Working Paper Series 134, Competitive Advantage in the Global Economy (CAGE).
  • Handle: RePEc:cge:wacage:134
    as

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    File URL: http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/fac/soc/economics/research/centres/cage/manage/publications/134-2013_roy.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Singh, Nirvikar, 2018. "Financial Inclusion: Concepts, Issues and Policies for India," Santa Cruz Department of Economics, Working Paper Series qt98p5m37s, Department of Economics, UC Santa Cruz.
    2. Singh, Prakarsh & Masters, William A., 2017. "Impact of caregiver incentives on child health: Evidence from an experiment with Anganwadi workers in India," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 55(C), pages 219-231.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    public services; information constraints; incentive pay; social proximity; knowledge transmission;
    All these keywords.

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