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Ghost Doctors: Absenteeism in Rural Bangladeshi Health Facilities

Author

Listed:
  • Nazmul Chaudhury
  • Jeffrey S. Hammer

Abstract

Unannounced visits were made to health clinics in Bangladesh to determine what proportion of medical professionals were at their assigned post. Averaged over all job categories and types of facility, the absentee rate was 35 percent. The absentee rate for physicians was 40 percent at the larger clinics and 74 percent at the smaller subcenters with a single physician. Whether the medical provider lives near the health facility, the opportunity cost of the provider's time, road access, and rural electrification are highly correlated with the rate and pattern of absenteeism. Copyright 2004, Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Nazmul Chaudhury & Jeffrey S. Hammer, 2004. "Ghost Doctors: Absenteeism in Rural Bangladeshi Health Facilities," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 18(3), pages 423-441.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:wbecrv:v:18:y:2004:i:3:p:423-441
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    Cited by:

    1. Jack, William & Lewis, Maureen, 2009. "Health investments and economic growth : macroeconomic evidence and microeconomic foundations," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4877, The World Bank.
    2. Xu, Guo, 2013. "Development through Empowerment: Delivering Effective Public Services – a Literature Review," ADB Economics Working Paper Series 382, Asian Development Bank.
    3. Leonard, Kenneth L. & Masatu, Melkiory C., 2010. "Using the Hawthorne effect to examine the gap between a doctor's best possible practice and actual performance," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 93(2), pages 226-234, November.
    4. Das, Jishnu & Hammer, Jeffrey, 2005. "Which doctor? Combining vignettes and item response to measure clinical competence," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 78(2), pages 348-383, December.
    5. Grant Miller & Kimberly Singer Babiarz, 2013. "Pay-for-Performance Incentives in Low- and Middle-Income Country Health Programs," NBER Working Papers 18932, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Grant Miller & Diana Pinto & Marcos Vera-Hernández, 2013. "Risk Protection, Service Use, and Health Outcomes under Colombia's Health Insurance Program for the Poor," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 5(4), pages 61-91, October.
    7. Clara Delavallade, 2014. "Quality Healthcare and Health Insurance Retention: Evidence from a Randomized Experiment in the Kolkata Slums," Working Papers id:5916, eSocialSciences.
    8. Edward N. Okeke & Amalavoyal V. Chari, 2015. "Can Institutional Deliveries Reduce Newborn Mortality? Evidence from Rwanda," Working Papers WR-1072, RAND Corporation.
    9. Nazmul Chaudhury & Jeffrey Hammer & Michael Kremer & Karthik Muralidharan & F. Halsey Rogers, 2006. "Missing in Action: Teacher and Health Worker Absence in Developing Countries," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 20(1), pages 91-116, Winter.
    10. Michael Callen & Saad Gulzar & Ali Hasanain & Abdul Rehman Khan & Yasir Khan & Muhammad Zia Mehmood, 2013. "Improving Public Health Delivery in Punjab, Pakistan: Issues and Opportunities," Lahore Journal of Economics, Department of Economics, The Lahore School of Economics, vol. 18(Special E), pages 249-269, September.
    11. World Bank, 2013. "Bangladesh - Poverty Assessment : Assessing a Decade of Progress in Reducing Poverty, 2000-2010," World Bank Other Operational Studies 16622, The World Bank.
    12. Jeffrey S. Hammer, 2013. "Balancing Market and Government Failure in Service Delivery," Lahore Journal of Economics, Department of Economics, The Lahore School of Economics, vol. 18(Special E), pages 1-19, September.
    13. Renfu Luo & Grant Miller & Scott Rozelle & Sean Sylvia & Marcos Vera-Hernández, 2015. "Can Bureaucrats Really Be Paid Like CEOs? School Administrator Incentives for Anemia Reduction in Rural China," NBER Working Papers 21302, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    14. World Bank, 2008. "Whispers to Voices," World Bank Other Operational Studies 26334, The World Bank.
    15. Francesco Grigoli Author-Email: fgrigoli@imf.org Author-Name: Eduardo Ley Author-Email: eley@worldbank.org, 2012. "Quality of Government and Living Standards," World Bank - Economic Premise, The World Bank, issue 89, pages 1-6, September.
    16. Dizon-Ross, Rebecca & Dupas, Pascaline & Robinson, Jonathan, 2015. "Governance and the Effectiveness of Public Health Subsidies," CEPR Discussion Papers 10690, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    17. Fiszbein, Ariel & Ringold, Dena & Rogers, F. Halsey, 2011. "Making services work : indicators, assessments, and benchmarking of the quality and governance of public service delivery in the human development sectors," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5690, The World Bank.
    18. Jayachandran, Seema, 2014. "Incentives to teach badly: After-school tutoring in developing countries," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 108(C), pages 190-205.
    19. Asadullah, M. Niaz & Savoia, Antonio & Mahmud, Wahiduddin, 2014. "Paths to Development: Is there a Bangladesh Surprise?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 62(C), pages 138-154.
    20. repec:eee:pubeco:v:156:y:2017:i:c:p:150-169 is not listed on IDEAS
    21. Asian Development Bank (ADB), 2012. "Impact of Maternal and Child Health Private Expenditure on Poverty and Inequity in Bangladesh: Bangladesh Facility Efficiency Survey 2011 - Technical Report A," ADB Reports RPT135431-3, Asian Development Bank (ADB), revised 02 Sep 2013.
    22. Pal, Sarmistha, 2015. "Impact of hospital delivery on child mortality: An analysis of adolescent mothers in Bangladesh," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 143(C), pages 194-203.
    23. Schmidt, Jean-Olivier & Ensor, Tim & Hossain, Atia & Khan, Salam, 2010. "Vouchers as demand side financing instruments for health care: A review of the Bangladesh maternal voucher scheme," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 96(2), pages 98-107, July.
    24. Kjetil Bjorvatn & Jakob Svensson, 2016. "Are not-for-profits different? Theory and evidence on the pricing of health services in Uganda," Economics of Governance, Springer, vol. 17(1), pages 1-10, February.

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