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Sara LaLumia

Personal Details

First Name:Sara
Middle Name:
Last Name:LaLumia
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pla486
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]
Terminal Degree: Economics Department; University of Michigan (from RePEc Genealogy)

Affiliation

Economics Department
Williams College

Williamstown, Massachusetts (United States)
http://econ.williams.edu/

: 413-597-2476
413-597-4045
24 Hopkins Hall Drive, Schapiro Building, Williamstown, MA 01267
RePEc:edi:edwilus (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Philippe Wingender & Sara LaLumia, 2015. "Income Effects in Labor Supply: Evidence from Child-Related Tax Benefits," Department of Economics Working Papers 2015-04, Department of Economics, Williams College.
  2. Sara LaLumia & James M. Salle & Nicolas Turner, 2013. "New Evidence on Taxes and the Timing of Birth," Department of Economics Working Papers 2013-06, Department of Economics, Williams College.
  3. Sara LaLumia & Laura Kawano, 2013. "How Income Changes During Unemployment: Evidence from Tax Return Data," Department of Economics Working Papers 2013-05, Department of Economics, Williams College, revised Mar 2015.
  4. Sara LaLumia & James Sallee, 2011. "The Value of Honesty: Empirical Estimates from the Case of the Missing Children," Department of Economics Working Papers 2011-05, Department of Economics, Williams College.
  5. Sara LaLumia, 2011. "The EITC, Tax Refunds, and Unemployment Spells," Department of Economics Working Papers 2011-08, Department of Economics, Williams College.
  6. Sara LaLumia, 2010. "Tax Preferences for Higher Education and Adult College Enrollment," Department of Economics Working Papers 2010-09, Department of Economics, Williams College.
  7. Sara LaLumia, 2009. "The Earned Income Tax Credit and Reported Self-Employment Income," Department of Economics Working Papers 2009-07, Department of Economics, Williams College.
  8. Sara LaLumia, 2006. "The Effects of Joint Taxation of Married Couples on Labor Supply and Non-wage Income," Working Papers 28, Department of Economics, College of William and Mary.

Articles

  1. Ronald Davies & Sara LaLumia, 2016. "Editorial note," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, vol. 23(1), pages 1-1, February.
  2. Ronald B. Davies & Sara LaLumia, 2016. "Editorial note," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, vol. 23(1), pages 1-1, February.
  3. Sara LaLumia & James M. Sallee & Nicholas Turner, 2015. "New Evidence on Taxes and the Timing of Birth," American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, American Economic Association, vol. 7(2), pages 258-293, May.
  4. Stephanie P. Browne & Sara LaLumia, 2014. "The Effects of Contraception on Female Poverty," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 33(3), pages 602-622, June.
  5. Sara LaLumia & James Sallee, 2013. "The value of honesty: empirical estimates from the case of the missing children," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, vol. 20(2), pages 192-224, April.
  6. Sara LaLumia, 2013. "The EITC, Tax Refunds, and Unemployment Spells," American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, American Economic Association, vol. 5(2), pages 188-221, May.
  7. LaLumia, Sara, 2012. "Tax Preferences for Higher Education and Adult College Enrollment," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association;National Tax Journal, vol. 65(1), pages 59-89, March.
  8. Sara LaLumia, 2011. "Why the Garden Club Couldn't Save Youngstown: The Transformation of the Rust Belt, by Sean Safford," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 51(1), pages 201-203, February.
  9. LaLumia, Sara, 2009. "The Earned Income Tax Credit and Reported Self-Employment Income," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association;National Tax Journal, vol. 62(2), pages 191-217, June.
  10. LaLumia, Sara, 2008. "The effects of joint taxation of married couples on labor supply and non-wage income," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 92(7), pages 1698-1719, July.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Blog mentions

As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
  1. Sara LaLumia, 2006. "The Effects of Joint Taxation of Married Couples on Labor Supply and Non-wage Income," Working Papers 28, Department of Economics, College of William and Mary.

    Mentioned in:

    1. Est-il fiscalement avantageux de se marier ?
      by Kanelbullix in Ecopublix on 2007-11-13 17:45:00

Wikipedia mentions

(Only mentions on Wikipedia that link back to a page on a RePEc service)
  1. Sara LaLumia, 2013. "The EITC, Tax Refunds, and Unemployment Spells," American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, American Economic Association, vol. 5(2), pages 188-221, May.

    Mentioned in:

    1. The EITC, Tax Refunds, and Unemployment Spells (AEJ:EP 2013) in ReplicationWiki ()

Working papers

  1. Philippe Wingender & Sara LaLumia, 2015. "Income Effects in Labor Supply: Evidence from Child-Related Tax Benefits," Department of Economics Working Papers 2015-04, Department of Economics, Williams College.

    Cited by:

    1. Melanie Guldi & Lucie Schmidt, 2017. "Taxes, Transfers, and Women’s Labor Supply in the United States," Working Papers 2017-01, University of Central Florida, Department of Economics.

  2. Sara LaLumia & James M. Salle & Nicolas Turner, 2013. "New Evidence on Taxes and the Timing of Birth," Department of Economics Working Papers 2013-06, Department of Economics, Williams College.

    Cited by:

    1. Torun, Huzeyfe & Tumen, Semih, 2016. "The Empirical Content of Season-of-Birth Effects: An Investigation with Turkish Data," IZA Discussion Papers 10203, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    2. Janice Compton & Lindsay M. Tedds, 2016. "Effects of the 2001 Extension of Paid Parental Leave Provisions on Birth Seasonality in Canada," Canadian Public Policy, University of Toronto Press, vol. 42(1), pages 65-82, March.
    3. Bischof, T.; Schmid, C.P.R.;, "undated". "Consumer Price Sensitivity and Health Plan Choice in a Regulated Competition Setting," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 17/16, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
    4. Sara LaLumia & James M. Sallee & Nicholas Turner, 2013. "New Evidence on Taxes and the Timing of Birth," NBER Working Papers 19283, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Apostolova-Mihaylova, Maria & Yelowitz, Aaron, 2015. "Health Insurance, Fertility, and the Wantedness of Pregnancies: Evidence from Massachusetts," MPRA Paper 61237, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. Clarke, Damian & Oreffice, Sonia & Quintana-Domeque, Climent, 2016. "The Demand for Season of Birth," IZA Discussion Papers 10072, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    7. Jeffrey T. Denning, 2017. "Born Under a Lucky Star: Financial Aid, College Completion, Labor Supply, and Credit Constraints," Upjohn Working Papers and Journal Articles 17-267, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research.
    8. Joshua D. Gottlieb & Richard R. Townsend & Ting Xu, 2016. "Experimenting with Entrepreneurship: The Effect of Job-Protected Leave," NBER Working Papers 22446, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. Wael S. Moussa, 2017. "Closer to the Finish Line? Compulsory Attendance, Grade Attainment, and High School Graduation," Education Finance and Policy, MIT Press, vol. 12(1), pages 28-53, Winter.
    10. Schulkind, Lisa & Shapiro, Teny Maghakian, 2014. "What a difference a day makes: Quantifying the effects of birth timing manipulation on infant health," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(C), pages 139-158.

  3. Sara LaLumia & Laura Kawano, 2013. "How Income Changes During Unemployment: Evidence from Tax Return Data," Department of Economics Working Papers 2013-05, Department of Economics, Williams College, revised Mar 2015.

    Cited by:

    1. Silvo, Aino, 2017. "House prices, lending standards, and the macroeconomy," Research Discussion Papers 4/2017, Bank of Finland.
    2. Danny Yagan, 2017. "Employment Hysteresis from the Great Recession," NBER Working Papers 23844, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

  4. Sara LaLumia & James Sallee, 2011. "The Value of Honesty: Empirical Estimates from the Case of the Missing Children," Department of Economics Working Papers 2011-05, Department of Economics, Williams College.

    Cited by:

    1. Quamrul Ashraf & Oded Galor, 2010. "The "Out of Africa" Hypothesis, Genetic Diversity, and Comparative Development," Working Papers 2010-7, Brown University, Department of Economics.
    2. Tazhitdinova, Alisa, 2015. "Reducing Evasion Through Self-Reporting: Theory and Evidence from Charitable Contributions," MPRA Paper 81612, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 2017.
    3. Sara LaLumia & James M. Sallee & Nicholas Turner, 2013. "New Evidence on Taxes and the Timing of Birth," NBER Working Papers 19283, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Fack, Gabrielle & Landais, Camille, 2016. "The effect of tax enforcement on tax elasticities: evidence from charitable contributions in France," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 64578, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    5. Olivier Bargain, 2017. "Welfare analysis and redistributive policies," The Journal of Economic Inequality, Springer;Society for the Study of Economic Inequality, vol. 15(4), pages 393-419, December.
    6. Maggie R. Jones & Amy B. O’Hara, 2016. "Do Doubled-Up Families Minimize Household-Level Tax Burden?," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association;National Tax Journal, vol. 69(3), pages 613-640, September.

  5. Sara LaLumia, 2011. "The EITC, Tax Refunds, and Unemployment Spells," Department of Economics Working Papers 2011-08, Department of Economics, Williams College.

    Cited by:

    1. Mesén Vargas, Juliana & Van der Linden, Bruno, 2017. "Is There Always a Trade-off between Insurance and Incentives? The Case of Unemployment with Subsistence Constraints," IZA Discussion Papers 11034, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    2. Sara LaLumia & James M. Sallee & Nicholas Turner, 2013. "New Evidence on Taxes and the Timing of Birth," NBER Working Papers 19283, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Laura Tach & Alicia Eads, 2015. "Trends in the Economic Consequences of Marital and Cohabitation Dissolution in the United States," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 52(2), pages 401-432, April.
    4. Philippe Wingender & Sara LaLumia, 2016. "Income Effects in Labor Supply: Evidence from Child-Related Tax Benefits," Working Papers 16-24, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.
    5. Can Cui, 2017. "Cash-on-hand and demand for credit," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 52(3), pages 1007-1039, May.
    6. Andrew Foote & Michel Grosz & Ann Huff Stevens, 2015. "Locate Your Nearest Exit: Mass Layoffs and Local Labor Market Response," NBER Working Papers 21618, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Raj Chetty & Amy Finkelstein, 2012. "Social Insurance: Connecting Theory to Data," NBER Working Papers 18433, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Blaufus, Kay & Hechtner, Frank & Möhlmann, Axel, 2014. "The effect of tax preparation expenses for employees: Evidence from Germany," arqus Discussion Papers in Quantitative Tax Research 157, arqus - Arbeitskreis Quantitative Steuerlehre.

  6. Sara LaLumia, 2010. "Tax Preferences for Higher Education and Adult College Enrollment," Department of Economics Working Papers 2010-09, Department of Economics, Williams College.

    Cited by:

    1. George B. Bulman & Caroline M. Hoxby, 2015. "The Returns to the Federal Tax Credits for Higher Education," NBER Working Papers 20833, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Turner, Nick, 2010. "Why Don’t Taxpayers Maximize their Tax-Based Student Aid? Salience and Inertial in Program Selection," University of California at San Diego, Economics Working Paper Series qt0pb3f440, Department of Economics, UC San Diego.
    3. Elsayed, Mahmoud A.A., 2016. "The Impact of Education Tax Benefits on College Completion," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 53(C), pages 16-30.
    4. Bednar, Steven & Gicheva, Dora, 2013. "Tax benefits for graduate education: Incentives for whom?," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 181-197.
    5. Schwerdt, Guido & Messer, Dolores & Wößmann, Ludger & Wolter, Stefan C., 2012. "The impact of an adult education voucher program: Evidence from a randomized field experiment," Munich Reprints in Economics 19921, University of Munich, Department of Economics.
    6. Bergman, Peter & Denning, Jeffrey T. & Manoli, Dayanand, 2017. "Broken Tax Breaks? Evidence from a Tax Credit Information Experiment with 1,000,000 Students," IZA Discussion Papers 10997, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    7. Susan Dynarski & Judith Scott-Clayton, 2016. "Tax Benefits for College Attendance," NBER Working Papers 22127, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Turner, Nicholas, 2011. "The Effect of Tax-Based Federal Student Aid on College Enrollment," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association;National Tax Journal, vol. 64(3), pages 839-861, September.
    9. Turner Nicholas, 2011. "Why Don't Taxpayers Maximize their Tax-Based Student Aid? Salience and Inertia in Program Selection," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 11(1), pages 1-24, December.

  7. Sara LaLumia, 2009. "The Earned Income Tax Credit and Reported Self-Employment Income," Department of Economics Working Papers 2009-07, Department of Economics, Williams College.

    Cited by:

    1. Emmanuel Saez, 2010. "Do Taxpayers Bunch at Kink Points?," American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, American Economic Association, vol. 2(3), pages 180-212, August.
    2. Marcelo Bergolo & Guillermo Cruces, 2016. "The Anatomy of Behavioral Responses to Social Assistance when Informal Employment is High," CEDLAS, Working Papers 0204, CEDLAS, Universidad Nacional de La Plata.
    3. Gunter, Samara, 2013. "State Earned Income Tax Credits and Participation in Regular and Informal Work," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association;National Tax Journal, vol. 66(1), pages 33-62, March.
    4. Buhlmann, Florian & Elsner, Benjamin & Peichl, Andreas, 2017. "Tax refunds and income manipulation evidence from the EITC," ZEW Discussion Papers 17-060, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
    5. Singleton, Perry, 2011. "The Effect of Taxes on Taxable Earnings: Evidence From the 2001 and Related U.S. Federal Tax Acts," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association;National Tax Journal, vol. 64(2), pages 323-351, June.

  8. Sara LaLumia, 2006. "The Effects of Joint Taxation of Married Couples on Labor Supply and Non-wage Income," Working Papers 28, Department of Economics, College of William and Mary.

    Cited by:

    1. Thomas F. Crossley & Sung-Hee Jeon, 2007. "Joint Taxation and the Labour Supply of Married Women: Evidence from the Canadian Tax Reform of 1988," Fiscal Studies, Institute for Fiscal Studies, vol. 28(3), pages 343-365, September.
    2. Amadeo Fuenmayor & Rafael Granell & Mauro Mediavilla, 2018. "The effects of separate taxation on labor participation of married couples. An empirical analysis using propensity score," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 16(2), pages 541-561, June.
    3. Mizuki Komura, 2013. "Tax reform and endogenous gender bargaining power," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 11(2), pages 175-192, June.
    4. Håkan Selin, 2014. "The rise in female employment and the role of tax incentives. An empirical analysis of the Swedish individual tax reform of 1971," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, vol. 21(5), pages 894-922, October.
    5. Schröder, Melanie & Schmitt, Norma & Heynemann, Britta & Brünn, Claudia, 2013. "Income Taxation and Labor Supply: An Experiment on Couple's Work Effort," Annual Conference 2013 (Duesseldorf): Competition Policy and Regulation in a Global Economic Order 79735, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    6. Fisher, Hayley, 2011. "Marriage penalties, marriage, and cohabitation," Working Papers 2011-12, University of Sydney, School of Economics.
    7. Andrew Bauer & Alan Macnaughton & Anindya Sen, 2015. "Income splitting and anti-avoidance legislation: evidence from the Canadian “kiddie tax”," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, vol. 22(6), pages 909-931, December.
    8. Melanie Guldi & Lucie Schmidt, 2017. "Taxes, Transfers, and Women’s Labor Supply in the United States," Working Papers 2017-01, University of Central Florida, Department of Economics.
    9. Stevenson, Adam, 2012. "The Labor Supply and Tax Revenue Consequences of Federal Same-Sex Marriage Legalization," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association;National Tax Journal, vol. 65(4), pages 783-806, December.
    10. Kalíšková, Klára, 2014. "Labor supply consequences of family taxation: Evidence from the Czech Republic," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(C), pages 234-244.
    11. Raaum Oddbjørn & Bratsberg Bernt & Røed Knut & Österbacka Eva & Eriksson Tor & Jäntti Markus & Naylor Robin A, 2008. "Marital Sorting, Household Labor Supply, and Intergenerational Earnings Mobility across Countries," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 7(2), pages 1-49, January.
    12. André Decoster & Peter Haan, 2011. "A Switch from Joint to Individual Taxation Is Welfare Improving," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1175, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    13. Clément Carbonnier, 2014. "The influence of taxes on employment of married women, evidence from the French joint income tax system," Sciences Po publications 23, Sciences Po.
    14. Gawande, Kishore & Jenkins-Smith, Hank & Yuan, May, 2013. "The long-run impact of nuclear waste shipments on the property market: Evidence from a quasi-experiment," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 65(1), pages 56-73.
    15. Patricia Apps & Ray Rees, 2016. "Optimal Taxation, Income Inequality and the Household," CESifo Working Paper Series 5845, CESifo Group Munich.
    16. Margit Schratzenstaller, 2012. "Gender Budgeting im Steuersystem," Working Paper Reihe der AK Wien - Materialien zu Wirtschaft und Gesellschaft 116, Kammer für Arbeiter und Angestellte für Wien, Abteilung Wirtschaftswissenschaft und Statistik.
    17. Sachverständigenrat zur Begutachtung der Gesamtwirtschaftlichen Entwicklung (ed.), 2007. "Das Erreichte nicht verspielen. Jahresgutachten 2007/08," Annual Economic Reports / Jahresgutachten, German Council of Economic Experts / Sachverständigenrat zur Begutachtung der gesamtwirtschaftlichen Entwicklung, volume 127, number 200708, April.
    18. Emily Y. Lin & Patricia K. Tong, 2017. "Married couple work participation and earnings elasticities: evidence from tax data," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, vol. 24(6), pages 997-1025, December.
    19. Klara Kaliskova, 2013. "Family Taxation and the Female Labor Supply: Evidence from the Czech Republic," CERGE-EI Working Papers wp496, The Center for Economic Research and Graduate Education - Economics Institute, Prague.
    20. Margit Schratzenstaller & Fanny Dellinger, 2018. "Gender-differentiated Effects of the Tax System on Labour Supply," WIFO Monatsberichte (monthly reports), WIFO, vol. 91(2), pages 105-120, February.
    21. Selin, Håkan, 2009. "The Rise in Female Employment and the Role of Tax Incentives. An Empirical Analysis of the Swedish Individual Tax Reform of 1971," Working Paper Series 2009:4, Uppsala University, Department of Economics.
    22. Chirvi, Malte, 2017. "Arbeiten Frauen aufgrund des Ehegattensplittings weniger? Ein quasi-experimenteller Ansatz für Deutschland," arqus Discussion Papers in Quantitative Tax Research 217, arqus - Arbeitskreis Quantitative Steuerlehre.
    23. Melanie Schröder & Norma Burow, 2016. "Couple's Labor Supply, Taxes, and the Division of Housework in a Gender-Neutral Lab," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1593, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.

Articles

  1. Sara LaLumia & James M. Sallee & Nicholas Turner, 2015. "New Evidence on Taxes and the Timing of Birth," American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, American Economic Association, vol. 7(2), pages 258-293, May.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  2. Sara LaLumia & James Sallee, 2013. "The value of honesty: empirical estimates from the case of the missing children," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, vol. 20(2), pages 192-224, April.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  3. Sara LaLumia, 2013. "The EITC, Tax Refunds, and Unemployment Spells," American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, American Economic Association, vol. 5(2), pages 188-221, May.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  4. LaLumia, Sara, 2012. "Tax Preferences for Higher Education and Adult College Enrollment," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association;National Tax Journal, vol. 65(1), pages 59-89, March.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  5. LaLumia, Sara, 2009. "The Earned Income Tax Credit and Reported Self-Employment Income," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association;National Tax Journal, vol. 62(2), pages 191-217, June.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  6. LaLumia, Sara, 2008. "The effects of joint taxation of married couples on labor supply and non-wage income," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 92(7), pages 1698-1719, July.
    See citations under working paper version above.Sorry, no citations of articles recorded.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

Access and download statistics for all items

Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 8 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-PBE: Public Economics (4) 2006-04-01 2013-09-28 2015-05-09 2016-05-14
  2. NEP-HIS: Business, Economic & Financial History (2) 2010-10-02 2011-07-13
  3. NEP-PUB: Public Finance (2) 2006-04-01 2013-09-28
  4. NEP-CIS: Confederation of Independent States (1) 2011-07-13
  5. NEP-EVO: Evolutionary Economics (1) 2011-05-14
  6. NEP-IUE: Informal & Underground Economics (1) 2011-08-02
  7. NEP-SOC: Social Norms & Social Capital (1) 2011-08-02
  8. NEP-TRA: Transition Economics (1) 2011-07-13

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