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Delayed Collection of Unemployment Insurance in Recessions

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  • Zoe Xie

Abstract

Using variations in unemployment insurance policies over time and across U.S. states, this paper provides evidence that allowing unemployed workers to delay the collection of benefits increases their job-finding rate. In a model with discrete job take-up decisions, benefit entitlement, wage-indexed benefits, and heterogeneous job types, I demonstrate that the policy can increase an unemployed worker's willingness to work, even though more benefits in general reduce the relative value of employment. In a calibrated quantitative model, I find that allowing delayed benefit collection increases the overall job finding rates and may lower the unemployment rate both in a steady state stationary economy and over a transition path during 2008?12.

Suggested Citation

  • Zoe Xie, 2019. "Delayed Collection of Unemployment Insurance in Recessions," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 2019-14, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedawp:2019-14
    DOI: 10.29338/wp2019-14
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Krueger, Alan B. & Mueller, Andreas, 2010. "Job search and unemployment insurance: New evidence from time use data," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 94(3-4), pages 298-307, April.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    health; frailty index; life cycle profiles;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • E24 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Employment; Unemployment; Wages; Intergenerational Income Distribution; Aggregate Human Capital; Aggregate Labor Productivity
    • J65 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Unemployment Insurance; Severance Pay; Plant Closings

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