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The Demand for Season of Birth

Author

Listed:
  • Damian Clarke

    (Universidad de Santiago de Chile)

  • Sonia Oreffice

    () (University of Surrey)

  • Climent Quintana-Domeque

    () (University of Oxford and St Edmund Hall)

Abstract

We study the determinants of season of birth, for white married women aged 20-45 in the US, using birth certificate and Census data. We also elicit the willingness to pay for season of birth through discrete choice experiments implemented on the Amazon Mechanical Turk platform. We document that the probability of a spring first birth is significantly related to mother's age, education, smoking status during pregnancy, and the mother working in "education, training, and library" occupations, whereas a summer first birth does not depend on socio-demographic characteristics. We find consistent but stronger correlates when focusing on second births, while all our findings are muted among unmarried women. We estimate the average willingness to pay for a spring birth to be 600 USD, which is about 18% of the most valued birth in our Amazon Mechanical Turk experimental sample or 15% of the mean charges for a normal birth in 2013 according to the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality.

Suggested Citation

  • Damian Clarke & Sonia Oreffice & Climent Quintana-Domeque, 2016. "The Demand for Season of Birth," Working Papers 2016-032, Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group.
  • Handle: RePEc:hka:wpaper:2016-032
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    File URL: http://humcap.uchicago.edu/RePEc/hka/wpaper/Clarke_Oreffice_Quintana-Domeque_2016_demand-season-birth.pdf
    File Function: First Version, December, 2016
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    Cited by:

    1. Molina, Oswaldo & Saldarriaga, Victor, 2017. "The perils of climate change: In utero exposure to temperature variability and birth outcomes in the Andean region," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 24(C), pages 111-124.
    2. Damian Clarke & Sonia Oreffice & Climent Quintana-Domeque, 2017. "On the Value of Birth Weight," Working Papers 2017-018, Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group.
    3. Libertad González Luna & Lidia Farré, 2017. "The effects of paternity leave on fertility and labor market outcomes," Economics Working Papers 1572, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    quarter of birth; willingness to pay; NVSS; ACS-IPUMS; Amazon Mechanical Turk; discrete choice experiments; fertility timing;

    JEL classification:

    • I10 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - General
    • J01 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - General - - - Labor Economics: General
    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth

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