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Patient preferences for managing asthma: results from a discrete choice experiment

Author

Listed:
  • Madeleine T. King

    (Centre for Health Economics Research and Evaluation (CHERE), University of Technology Sydney (UTS), Australia)

  • Jane Hall

    (Centre for Health Economics Research and Evaluation (CHERE), University of Technology Sydney (UTS), Australia)

  • Emily Lancsar

    (Business School (Economics) and Centre for Health Service Research, University of Newcastle upon Tyne, UK)

  • Denzil Fiebig
  • Ishrat Hossain

    (Centre for Health Economics Research and Evaluation (CHERE), University of Technology Sydney (UTS), Australia)

  • Jordan Louviere
  • Helen K. Reddel
  • Christine R. Jenkins

Abstract

Effective control of asthma requires regular preventive medication. Poor medication adherence suggests that patient preferences for medications may differ from the concerns of the prescribing clinicians. This study investigated patient preferences for preventive medications across symptom control, daily activities, medication side-effects, convenience and costs, using a discrete choice experiment embedded in a randomized clinical trial involving patients with mild-moderate persistent asthma. The present data were collected after patients had received 6 weeks' treatment with one of two drugs. Three choice options were presented, to continue with the current drug, to change to an alternative, hypothetical drug, or to take no preventive medication. Analysis used random parameter multinomial logit. Most respondents chose to continue with their current drug in most choice situations but this tendency differed depending on which medication they had been allocated. Respondents valued their ability to participate in usual daily activities and sport, preferred minimal symptoms, and were less likely to choose drugs with side-effects. Cost was also significant, but other convenience attributes were not. Demographic characteristics did not improve the model fit. This study illustrates how discrete choice experiments may be embedded in a clinical trial to provide insights into patient preferences. Copyright © 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Suggested Citation

  • Madeleine T. King & Jane Hall & Emily Lancsar & Denzil Fiebig & Ishrat Hossain & Jordan Louviere & Helen K. Reddel & Christine R. Jenkins, 2007. "Patient preferences for managing asthma: results from a discrete choice experiment," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 16(7), pages 703-717.
  • Handle: RePEc:wly:hlthec:v:16:y:2007:i:7:p:703-717
    DOI: 10.1002/hec.1193
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. repec:spr:envpol:v:20:y:2018:i:1:d:10.1007_s10018-017-0181-x is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Emily Lancsar & Joffre Swait, 2014. "Reconceptualising the External Validity of Discrete Choice Experiments," PharmacoEconomics, Springer, vol. 32(10), pages 951-965, October.
    3. Lieke Boonen & Frederik Schut & Bas Donkers & Xander Koolman, 2009. "Which preferred providers are really preferred? Effectiveness of insurers’ channeling incentives on pharmacy choice," International Journal of Health Economics and Management, Springer, vol. 9(4), pages 347-366, December.
    4. Waleska Sigüernza & Petr Mariel, 2013. "Valoración económica de los servicios sanitarios en la Comunidad Autónoma del País Vasco," Hacienda Pública Española, IEF, vol. 207(4), pages 71-99, December.
    5. Regier, Dean A. & Ryan, Mandy & Phimister, Euan & Marra, Carlo A., 2009. "Bayesian and classical estimation of mixed logit: An application to genetic testing," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 28(3), pages 598-610, May.
    6. Sivey, Peter & Scott, Anthony & Witt, Julia & Joyce, Catherine & Humphreys, John, 2012. "Junior doctors’ preferences for specialty choice," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 31(6), pages 813-823.
    7. Arne Hole & Julie Kolstad, 2012. "Mixed logit estimation of willingness to pay distributions: a comparison of models in preference and WTP space using data from a health-related choice experiment," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 42(2), pages 445-469, April.
    8. repec:spr:pharme:v:35:y:2017:i:7:d:10.1007_s40273-017-0506-4 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Paul Scuffham & Jennifer Whitty & Matthew Taylor & Ruth Saxby, 2010. "Health system choice," Applied Health Economics and Health Policy, Springer, vol. 8(2), pages 89-97, March.
    10. Hole, Arne Risa, 2008. "Modelling heterogeneity in patients' preferences for the attributes of a general practitioner appointment," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(4), pages 1078-1094, July.
    11. repec:spr:patien:v:10:y:2017:i:2:d:10.1007_s40271-016-0201-0 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. Emily Lancsar & Jordan Louviere, 2008. "Conducting Discrete Choice Experiments to Inform Healthcare Decision Making," PharmacoEconomics, Springer, vol. 26(8), pages 661-677, August.
    13. Lancsar, Emily & Wildman, John & Donaldson, Cam & Ryan, Mandy & Baker, Rachel, 2011. "Deriving distributional weights for QALYs through discrete choice experiments," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(2), pages 466-478, March.
    14. Mandeville, Kate L. & Ulaya, Godwin & Lagarde, Mylène & Muula, Adamson S. & Dzowela, Titha & Hanson, Kara, 2016. "The use of specialty training to retain doctors in Malawi: A discrete choice experiment," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 169(C), pages 109-118.
    15. Aleksandra Torbica & Giovanni Fattore & Fabio Ayala, 2014. "Eliciting Preferences to Inform Patient-Centred Policies: the Case of Psoriasis," PharmacoEconomics, Springer, vol. 32(2), pages 209-223, February.
    16. Kent Sweeting & Jennifer Whitty & Paul Scuffham & Michael Yelland, 2011. "Patient Preferences for Treatment of Achilles Tendon Pain," The Patient: Patient-Centered Outcomes Research, Springer;Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, vol. 4(1), pages 45-54, January.
    17. Emily Lancsar & Peter Burge, 2014. "Choice modelling research in health economics," Chapters,in: Handbook of Choice Modelling, chapter 28, pages 675-687 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    18. Jesús Clemente López & Pedro García Castrillo & María A. González Alvarez & Marcos Sanso Frago, 2014. "Una evaluación de la efectividad de la formación ocupacional para desempleados antes y después de la crisis económica: el caso de Aragón," Hacienda Pública Española, IEF, vol. 208(1), pages 77-106, March.

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